Friday, September 28, 2012

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Mon, Oct 1

Finish Reading the article on Ida Tarbel and take notes.

Please consider:

1. What does the author want you to think and know about Ida Tarbel?

2.  What was Tarbel's position on women's suffrage and rights?

3.  Why does author call Tarbel a contradiction?

4.  How might you use this article in your essay?

Quiz on Wednesday

Politics and Government Homework - Due Mon, Oct 1

  • Re-read pgs 7- 29 in How Democratic is the American Constitution?
1 - Robert Dhal references and discusses several of the framers: James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, George Wilson, George Mason.  For each, provide one quote be used to support either a claim or a counter-claim regarding the essential question - Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?

2 - Why did the framers construct a federal system instead of a unitary system?

3 - Discuss Hamilton's view about equal representation in the Senate.

4 - Discuss the "elevated discussion" that took place between Gunning Bedford of Delaware and Rufus King of Massachusetts.  

5 - Select and discuss at least three "undemocratic" features of the Constitution.  Why does Dhal feel these features are undemocratic?  Do you agree or disagree?  Explain.

6 - Discuss the colonial period/Declaration of Independence and its impact on American attitudes about natural rights.

7 - Discuss differences between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans.

8 - How did the availability of land impact the evolution of the republic?

9 - In what ways did amendments help to make the Constitution more democratic? 

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework Due - Thurs, Sept 27

Unit 1 - Democracy and Equality for Women - The Right to Vote
Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?


1) Copy into notebooks:

The Four Causes of WWI
nationalism, militarism, secret alliances, imperialism

nationalism: when an ethnic, religious or cultural group feels entitled to its own state.

militarism: when a country's economy and culture is based on the military.

secret alliances: agreements between two or more countries to support each other during war, unbeknownst to other nations.

imperialism: when a country dominates another economically, politically and culturally.

Two sides of WWI

Allies/Triple Entente (Britain, France, Russia, USA)
Central Powers/Triple Alliance (Germany, Ottoman Empire, Austria Hungary)

2) Read/Take Notes:

Summary of Events
The Start of the War

World War I began on July 28, 1914, when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. This seemingly small conflict between two countries spread rapidly: soon, Germany, Russia, Great Britain, and France were all drawn into the war, largely because they were involved in treaties that obligated them to defend certain other nations. Western and eastern fronts quickly opened along the borders of Germany and Austria-Hungary.

The Western and Eastern Fronts

The first month of combat consisted of bold attacks and rapid troop movements on both fronts. In the west, Germany attacked first Belgium and then France. In the east, Russia attacked both Germany and Austria-Hungary. In the south, Austria-Hungary attacked Serbia. Following the Battle of the Marne (September 5–9, 1914), the western front became entrenched in central France and remained that way for the rest of the war. The fronts in the east also gradually locked into place.

The Ottoman Empire

Late in 1914, the Ottoman Empire was brought into the fray as well, after Germany tricked Russia into thinking that Turkey had attacked it. As a result, much of 1915 was dominated by Allied actions against the Ottomans in the Mediterranean. First, Britain and France launched a failed attack on the Dardanelles. This campaign was followed by the British invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula. Britain also launched a separate campaign against the Turks in Mesopotamia. Although the British had some successes in Mesopotamia, the Gallipoli campaign and the attacks on the Dardanelles resulted in British defeats.

Trench Warfare

The middle part of the war, 1916 and 1917, was dominated by continued trench warfare in both the east and the west. Soldiers fought from dug-in positions, striking at each other with machine guns, heavy artillery, and chemical weapons. Though soldiers died by the millions in brutal conditions, neither side had any substantive success or gained any advantage.

The United States’ Entrance and Russia’s Exit

Despite the stalemate on both fronts in Europe, two important developments in the war occurred in 1917. In early April, the United States, angered by attacks upon its ships in the Atlantic, declared war on Germany. Then, in November, the Bolshevik Revolution prompted Russia to pull out of the war.

The End of the War and Armistice

Although both sides launched renewed offensives in 1918 in an all-or-nothing effort to win the war, both efforts failed. The fighting between exhausted, demoralized troops continued to plod along until the Germans lost a number of individual battles and very gradually began to fall back. A deadly outbreak of influenza, meanwhile, took heavy tolls on soldiers of both sides. Eventually, the governments of both Germany and Austria-Hungary began to lose control as both countries experienced multiple mutinies from within their military structures.

The war ended in the late fall of 1918, after the member countries of the Central Powers signed armistice agreements one by one. Germany was the last, signing its armistice on November 11, 1918. As a result of these agreements, Austria-Hungary was broken up into several smaller countries. Germany, under the Treaty of Versailles, was severely punished with hefty economic reparations, territorial losses, and strict limits on its rights to develop militarily.

Germany After the War

Many historians, in hindsight, believe that the Allies were excessive in their punishment of Germany and that the harsh Treaty of Versailles actually planted the seeds of World War II, rather than foster peace. The treaty’s declaration that Germany was entirely to blame for the war was a blatant untruth that humiliated the German people. Furthermore, the treaty imposed steep war reparations payments on Germany, meant to force the country to bear the financial burden of the war. Although Germany ended up paying only a small percentage of the reparations it was supposed to make, it was already stretched financially thin by the war, and the additional economic burden caused enormous resentment. Ultimately, extremist groups, such as the Nazi Party, were able to exploit this humiliation and resentment and take political control of the country in the decades following.

c) Study Map and print/draw in notebook:



d) Define each of the following words and use each in a sentence. List the part of speech.

avert
exultation
abyss
salient
idle
mutiny
consent
abridge
financier
paradox
ingenuity
supplant
stringent
confer
plunder
deliberate
proclaim
emancipate
sedition

e)Watch the following film clips and take notes.
Notes should:
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the article's central ideas
- provide evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- be neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence
video






video

I feel as if a few of you have not looked at the essay rubric yet.  Please do so:
http://mrcopelandsclass.blogspot.com/2012/09/democratizing-america-unit-1-democracy.html

Politics and Government Homework - Due Thurs, Sept 27

Unit 1: Did the Constitution's framers in tend to create a revolutionary and democratic government? 
1 - Read and outline/take notes on Article 2 of the United States Constitution.  Consider the following:

a) The intent of the authors.
b) Is this democratic?  Why?
c) How is this a reflection of the time period?
d) Can this help me develop a claim? How?
e) Might I quote this in my paper?

 **As always define any words with which you are unfamiliar.  Place synonyms above as you read.  Your text should be annotated.

I feel as if you all have not looked at the response essay rubric.  Please do so:

http://mrcopelandsclass.blogspot.com/2012/09/politics-and-government-response-essay.html




Monday, September 24, 2012

Politics and Government Homework - Due Tuesday, Sept 25

Finish reading and outlining Article 1 of the Constitution


Saturday, September 22, 2012

Interesting Link

Hey Folks,

In Politics and Government we were talking about the children produced by unions between slave owners and slaves.  Check this out:

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/white-slave-children-new-orleans-1860s-propaganda-campaign-gallery-1.1164989?pmSlide=0

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Mon, Sept 24

Unit 1 - Democracy and Equality for Women - The Right to Vote
Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

Finish Zinn Chapter 13 pgs 349-357

Make notes in your notebook (or type and tape in notebook; notes will be checked for homework credit on 4 pt scale) Be prepared to discuss your claims with a partner and as a class tomorrow.


4 - clearly shows connections between at least 2 causes for Women's Suffrage Movement: industrialization, immigration, increases in women's education, WWI
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the article's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections between 2 causes for Women's Suffrage Movement: industrialization, immigration, increases in women's education, WWI
- demonstrates understanding of most of the article's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



2 - shows connections between one or two causes for Women's Suffrage Movement: industrialization, immigration, increases in women's education, WWI
- demonstrates understanding of two or less of the article's central ideas
- little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; little or no numeric data; little mention of major events or people
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



1 - smh

Politics and Government Homework - Due Mon, Sept 24

1) Vocabulary - Define each of the following terms. Include the part of speech. Use each in a sentence.

reluctant
progenitor
stern
premise
miniscule
derive
proviso
prescient
somber
maxim
arbiter
odious
despot
deliberation
anomaly
folklore
conciliation
indolent
constituent
hypergamous
smolder
lucrative
sallow
caricature
regal
mediocrity
nettle
ad hoc
desultory
shinnied

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Sept 20

Read Battle for Suffrage Packet pgs 1-7

Take notes

Notes will be graded on 4pt scale

Friday, September 14, 2012

Politics and Government - Homework Due, Wed Sept 19



Unit 1 - Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?


Two reading assignments: Inventing a Nation pg 1-13, How Democratic is the Constitution 1-31

a) Read pages 1-13 in Inventing a Nation by Gore Vidal
Answer the following questions. Each answer should be several sentences and, whenever possible, make connections to the Zinn chapter "A Kind of Revolution".



b) take notes, answer the following questions

1. Discuss this quote: "George Washington...was serioulsy broke."
Why was George Washington having financial problems? How did his social class and reputation contribute to these problems?

2. Why was there concern about the Articles of Confederation?

3. Explain in detail the difference between Federalists and Anti-Federalists. Include the role of regional differences in your answers.

4. Discuss this quote: "In this crisis there were no Federalists, no future Republicans: only frightened men of property."
What is the crisis? Why does the author of the book want you to know, think, and believe after reading this statement? Explain.

5. What was the initial purpose of the Philidelphia convention? Why was Washington conflicted about attending? Why was his presence needed?

6. Describe the new government formed by the Constitution. How did the new Constitution deal with slavery?


c) Read 1-31 in How Democratic is the Constitution?

d) Take notes; answers the following questions. 

1.  Discuss Hamilton's views of a republic and his attitude about democracy.  

2.  Why does Dahl title his chapter "What the Framers Couldn't Know"?

3.  On page 11, Dahl says "We can be profoundly grateful for one crucial restriction, the Framers were limited to consider only a republican form of government".  Why should we be grateful? What alternatives did the Framers have?

4.  What was the Sedition Act and why did it pass?

5.  How were senators selected?  


Vocabulary

Proviso - a condition attached to an agreement

Dividends -
a sum of money paid regularly (typically quarterly) by a company to its shareholders out of its profits (or reserves)

Nurture -
care for and encourage the growth or development of
Iconic - of, relating to, or of the nature of an icon

Quorum -
the minimum number of members of an assembly that must be present to make a meeting valid

Mitigate -
make less severe, serious, or painful

Onerous -
(of a task, duty, or responsibility) Involving a burdensome amount of effort and difficulty

Subservient -
prepared to obey others unquestioningly

Plenipotentiary -
one with the full power of independent action on behalf of one's government

Armory -
a place where arms are kept

Rhetoric -
the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing

Exert -
apply or bring to bear (a force, influence, or quality)

Disingenuous - n
ot candid or sincere, typically by pretending that one knows less about something than one really does

Supple -
bending and moving easily and gracefully; flexible

Creed -
a system of Christian or other religious belief; a faith

Pellucid -
translucently clear

To engorge -
cause to swell with blood, water, or another fluid

Implicit -
implied though not plainly expressed

Lavish - sumptuously rich and elaborate

Indulgent - having or indicating a readiness or over readiness to be generous to or lenient with someone

Transmutation - the action of changing or the state of being changed into another form

Retrogressive - retrograde: going from better to worse

Heir - a person legally entitled to the property or rank of another on that person's death

Revenues - income, esp. when of a company or organization and of a substantial nature

Magnates - a wealthy and influential person, esp. in business

Untidy - not arranged neatly and in order

Tottering - move in a feeble or unsteady way

Commerce - the activity of buying and selling, esp. on a large scale

Tranquility - an untroubled state; free from disturbances

Disingenuous - not candid or sincere, typically by pretending that one knows less about something than one really does

Tumults -  confusion or disorder

Obscurity - the state of being unknown, inconspicuous, or unimportant

Unwitting - (of a person) not aware of the full facts: "an unwitting accomplice"

To cross the Rubicon - means to pass a point of no return, and refers to Julius Caesar's army's crossing of the river in 49BC, which was considered an act of insurrection

Archetypal - very typical of a certain kind of person or thing

Unanimously - of one mind; without dissent; "the Senate unanimously approved the bill"; "we voted unanimously

Veto - a constitutional right to reject a decision or proposal made by a law-making body

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Wed, Sept 19

Unit 1 - Democracy and Equality for Women - The Right to Vote
Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

1) Read Zinn pgs 332-349

2) Make notes in your notebook (or type and tape in notebook; notes will be checked for homework credit on 4 pt scale) Summarize your thoughts at the end.  Be prepared to discuss your claims with a partner and as a class.


Rubric:

4 - clearly shows connections between at least 2 causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement: industrialization, immigration, increases in women's education, WWI
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the article's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections between 2 causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement: industrialization, immigration, increases in women's education, WWI
- demonstrates understanding of most of the article's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



2 - shows connections between one or two causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement: industrialization, immigration, increases in women's education, WWI
- demonstrates understanding of two or less of the article's central ideas
- little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; little or no numeric data; little mention of major events or people
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



1 -__-

Politics and Government - Shays' Rebellion, 1787 Part 1

video

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Friday, Sept 14

1 - Define:

entrepreneur
foundries
lure
teeming
commute
populism
multifaceted
welfare state
domestic 

2 - Read: Industrializing America

3 - Take notes in notebook or type and tape into notebook

Rubric:

 4 - includes all of the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; includes statistical and numeric data; uses titles to distinguish different topics, titles reflect titles in handout; is neat and organized

3 - includes the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; includes statistical and numeric data; uses titles to distinguish different topics; is neat and organized

2 - includes a list of information, but does not show any evidence of thought or attempt to summarize central ideas and themes; sloppy

1 - o.0 

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Politics and Government Homework Due - Friday, Sept 14

Read Zinn 96-102

Answer the following questions. Use the vocabulary list to assist you as you read. In addition to answering the questions, use each word in a sentence.

1. Discuss the right to vote in the new Constitution.

2. Zinn suggests that there is more to democracy than voting. What does he mean?

3. What was the basis for the "factional struggles that were developing?"

4. Why does Zinn seem to doubt that the "government...maintain[s] peace...as a referee between two equally matched fighters"?

5. Discuss the quote from Madison in Federalist #10. What does he want people to know, think believe?

6. Discuss the compromise between Northern business and Southern slaveholders.

7. Why do you think the Constitution protected "life, liberty and property" instead of the pursuit of happiness?

8. Write several sentences to describe the following terms. Include a quote for each.
a) Bill of Rights
b) Sedition Act
c) Whiskey Rebellion

popular election: universal suffrage (also universal adult suffrage, general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to adult citizens (or subjects) as a whole, though it may also mean extending said right to minors and non-citizens.

tumultuous: disruptive, characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination; "effects of the struggle will be violent and disruptive"; "riotous times"; "these troubled areas"; "the tumultuous years of his administration"; "a turbulent and unruly childhood"

faction/factional: in politics, a political faction is a grouping of like-minded individuals, especially within a political organization, such as a political party, a trade union, or other group.

unison: corresponding exactly; "marching in unison"
occurring together or simultaneously; "the two spoke in unison"

apt: naturally disposed toward; "he is apt to ignore matters he considers unimportant"; "I am not minded to answer any questions"

pervade: to be in every part of; to spread through

tempestuous: stormy, characterized by violent emotions or behavior; "a stormy argument"; "a stormy marriage"

repress: put down by force or intimidation; "The government quashes any attempt of an uprising"; "China keeps down her dissidents very efficiently"; "The rich landowners subjugated the peasants working the land"

insurrection: rebellion, organized opposition to authority; a conflict in which one faction tries to wrest control from another

delusion: a fixed belief that is either false, fanciful, or derived from deception. Psychiatry defines the term more specifically as a belief that is pathological (the result of an illness or illness process). ...

lament: a cry of sorrow and grief; "their pitiful laments could be heard throughout the ward"

illicit: contrary to accepted morality (especially sexual morality) or convention; "an illicit association with his secretary"

delegate: a person appointed or elected to represent others

Politics and Government Homework - Due Thursday, Sept 13

Read Zinn pages 77-96

Answer each of the following questions using SEVERAL COMPLETE SENTENCES. Include at least one quote that helped you determine your answer.

1. Which segments of the population supported the war, which were against and which were neutral? Why do you think this was the case?

2. Which groups were not allowed to participate in the Revolutionary Militia? Why do you think they were forbidden?

3. Discuss the findings of historian John Shy. What does he seem to be suggesting about the relationship between social class and war?

4. Discuss the Connecticut draft. Do you think this draft was democratic? Why or why not?

5. How do the soldiers react to Robert Morris?

6. Why might one describe the Maryland constitution as aristocratic? (aristocratic - a form of government in which a few of the most prominent citizens rule)

7. Discuss concerns about poor whites as they related to blacks.

8. Zinn seems to be suggesting that the war was more about class than independence. Provide three quotes that support his claim. Explain why you have selected each quote.

9. Compare the British relationship with Indians to the French relationship with Indians.

10. Discuss the British use of biological warfare.

11. Why did Inidans side with the British during the Revolution?

12. Reflect on Zinn's discussion of blacks before and after the Revolution.
a) Why did slavery expand in the South and not the North?
b) Discuss the demands that free blacks made on society.


13. Compare and contrast the opinions of Charles Beard and George Bankcroft regarding the Constitution.

14. List the economic interests groups who attended the Constitutional Convention.

15. What prompted Shays' Rebellion? Consider both economic and political reasons.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

No Homework for Politics and Government


Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Wed, Sept 12

Read through page 332 in Zinn. Answer the following questions using complete sentences. Include a quote from the text to support your answer.

1. Discuss Upton Sinclair's book The Jungle. Why do you think he wanted more government regulation of business? Why do you think such problems were new in the Twentieth Century?

2. Discuss the relationship between banks and railroads.

3. Discuss Taylorism. How were immigrants impacted by Taylorism? Why do you think some people call typical public high schools with bells and timed periods the "factory model"?

4. What happened at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company? Why do you think this led to increased calls for regulation of business?

5. Analyze the findings of the Commission on Industrial Relations, 1914. What would you have said next if you were Weinstock?

6. How did race impact the ability of workers to organize into unions?

7. Compare the AFL with the IWW. Construct a Venn Diagram and write several sentences.

8. What is a general strike? What would that look like in New York City? Explain.

Monday, September 10, 2012

An SOF Alum's Non-Profit Organization

Hey all!  My former student Tiffany Bender (class of 07) has started a great non-profit and it is actually being nominated for Back Girls Rock! 

Please vote for her!

http://www.bet.com/shows/black-girls-rock/2012/black-girls-rock-mad-girls.html


Politics and Government - Response Essay

Response Essay

In this unit we will examine the roots of our republic. Conventional wisdom suggests our republic is democratic in nature, reflecting the democratic impulses of our "founding fathers". Historians such as Howard Zinn seem to challenge this notion. Others such as Gore Vidal and Robert Dhal have more nuanced views.  In this essay you will deconstruct the arguments of these historians to develop your own interpretation of the framers and their intentions when drafting the United States Constitution.


You will write a formal essay that demonstrates your understanding of class texts, lectures,  films, and discussions. Your essay should be 5 pages, typed, double spaced, 12 pt font. In this essay you will construct an argument that responds to the following question:

Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?

Your paper should discuss at least one of the following:

- The distinct feelings about revolution and democracy held by the "Founding Fathers"

- The structure of the government and/or the democratic or undemocratic aspects of each branch.

- The manner in which different "Founding Fathers" implemented the new Constitution; the way they used their roles in government to shape domestic and foreign policy.




Your paper should contain evidence from all of the following sources:

A) Inventing a Nation by Gore Vidal

B) "A Kind of Revolution" by Howard Zinn

C) How Democratic is the Constitution by Robert Dhal
 

D) Who Built America? pgs TBA (This is a class reference text. You must use workshop time in class to gather evidence from this book. You may not take it home.)

E) United States Constitution, Federalist 

F) Excerpt from Gordon Wood essay "How Democratic is the Constitution?"

G)  Class notes on lectures, films, discussions, and Constitution Center Field Trip



Rubric for Essay

HISTORICAL CONTENT

16 - Demonstrates a clear and sophisticated understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding several of the framers and the Constitution

12 - Demonstrates a clear understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding several of the framers and the Constitution

8 - Demonstrates some understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; attempts to discuss the opinions and arguments presented by one or two historians regarding one or two of the framers and the Constitution

4 - Demonstrates little or no understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; does not discusses the opinions and arguments presented by historians regarding the framers and the Constitution; provides a summary of events without making an argument


INTRODUCTION, DISTINCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PRECISE CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS
4 - Introduces, distinguishes and develops precise claims and counterclaims throughout the entire essay to create a strong and nuanced argument; cites strong and thorough evidence from A-F above.

3 - States a precise claim that is developed throughout the entire essay; provides relevant and thorough evidence from of A-F; evaluates claim against some counterclaims.

2 - States a claim that is developed throughout much of the essay; provides relevant evidence from several of A-F.

1 - Provides some information, details, and/or evidence related to claim but does not state a claim.


USE OF SPECIFIC LANGUAGE AND VARIED SYNTAX TO LINK CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS, AND EVIDENCE

4 - Uses a variety of specific transitional words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims and/or evidence. Appropriately incorporates new vocabulary learned in this unit.

3 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

2 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

1 - Uses simple words/phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.


OBSERVATION AND MAINTENANCE OF APPROPRIATE TONE, STYLE, NORMS AND CONVENTIONS


4 - Observes and maintains objective tone and formal style throughout the entire essay while attending to the norms and conventions of a history essay. Discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution


3 - Observes and maintains relevant tone and style throughout the entire essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a history essay in most of the essay. Discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution.

2 - Uses relevant tone and style consistently throughout sections/portions of the essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a social studies essay in specific paragraphs or sections of the essay. Attempts to discuss the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution

1 - Uses relevant style and tone sporadically; fails to attend to the norms of a social studies essay in specific sentences or specific portions of the essay. Fails to discuss the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution


PROVISION OF RELEVANT CONCLUDING STATEMENT

4 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument while extending insight and/or prescribing further relevant action

3 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument

2 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports several of the major claims of the argument

1 - Provides a concluding statement that is somewhat relevant to the argument presented


ABILITY TO DEMONSTRATE A COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE

4 - Demonstrates command of a variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout the essay; resolves issues of complex or contested usage.

3 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout most of the essay.

2 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout sections of the essay.

1 - Demonstrates some command of proper sentence structure, use of basic phrases (noun, verb) and simple clauses (independent and dependent).


DEMONSTRATE COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH CAPITALIZATION, PUNCTUATION, AND SPELLING

4 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to hyphenation), and spelling consistently throughout the text.

3 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling consistently throughout most of the text.

2 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to semicolon/colon usage), and spelling consistently throughout sections/portions of the text.

1 - Demonstrates some command of the conventions of capitalization (names, beginning of sentence), punctuation (end punctuation, basic comma usage) and spelling.

Democratizing Twentieth Century America - Response Essay - Due Mon, Nov 5

Democratizing America Unit 1 – Democracy and Equality for Women: Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

Response Essay - Due Monday, November 5

In this unit we will study the Industrial Revolution as a context for understanding how and why women got the right to vote when they did. In this essay, you will discuss the Women's Suffrage Movement. You will demonstrate your understanding of this movement--its roots, its successes and its limitations. You will also demonstrate your understanding of the historic context by discussing the rise of socialism, Progressivism, and WWI.

Essential Question: Why then? Why did the Women's Suffrage Movement get underway when it did? (90%)

5 pages typed, double spaced, 12 pt font.

Reflection questions (10%):


What gains were won?  What gains were sought but not won?  If the reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment? 

1 page typed, double spaced, 12 pt font.

In this essay you must include evidence obtained from the following sources:

a) Howard Zinn - "The Socialist Challenge" and "War is the Health of the State"
b) Kerber, De Hart - "Industrializing America"
c) Who Built America? - "Radicals and Reformers in the Progressive Era" pgs 213-229 "Woman Suffrage", "Factory Reform and the Conditions of Labor", "The Garment Industry and Working Women's Activism", "Socialist, Marxists and Anarchists" and pgs 286-292 **(this book is only available in class and you must use class workshop time to take your notes)
d) Women's Suffrage Packet

e) Industrializing America  
f) PBS American Experience - Triangle Shirtwaist 
g) other selected class links and documents and film clips
Rubric (seven categories)

HISTORICAL CONTENT


16 - Demonstrates a clear and sophisticated understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses at least 3 of the four causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement and several individuals and/or people involved.

12 - Demonstrates a clear understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses at least 3 of the four causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement and several individuals and/or people involved.

8 - Demonstrates an understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discuss at least 2 of the four causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement and several individuals and/or people involved.

4 - Demonstrates little or no understanding of the historical time period and/or the cause and effect relationships between significant events; inaccurately discusses the Women's Suffrage Movement and/or several individuals involved.


INTRODUCTION, DISTINCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PRECISE CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS

4 - Introduces, distinguishes and develops precise claims and counterclaims throughout the entire essay to create a strong and nuanced argument; cites strong and thorough evidence from A-E above.

3 - States a precise claim that is developed throughout the entire essay; provides relevant and thorough evidence from of A-E; evaluates claim against some counterclaims.

2 - States a claim that is developed throughout much of the essay; provides relevant evidence from several of A-E.

1 - Provides some information, details, and/or evidence related to claim but does not state a claim.


USE OF SPECIFIC LANGUAGE AND VARIED SYNTAX TO LINK CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS, AND EVIDENCE
4 - Uses a variety of specific transitional words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims and/or evidence. Appropriately incorporates new vocabulary learned in this unit.

3 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

2 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

1 - Uses simple words/phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.


OBSERVATION AND MAINTENANCE OF APPROPRIATE TONE, STYLE, NORMS AND CONVENTIONS


4 - Observes and maintains objective tone and formal style throughout the entire essay while attending to the norms and conventions of a history essay.

3 - Observes and maintains relevant tone and style throughout the entire essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a history essay in most of the essay.

2 - Uses relevant tone and style consistently throughout sections/portions of the essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a social studies essay in specific paragraphs or sections of the essay.

1 - Uses relevant style and tone sporadically; attends to the norms of a social studies essay in specific sentences or specific portions of the essay.


PROVISION OF RELEVANT CONCLUDING STATEMENT

4 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument while extending insight and/or prescribing further relevant action

3 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument

2 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports several of the major claims of the argument

1 - Provides a concluding statement that is somewhat relevant to the argument presented


ABILITY TO DEMONSTRATE A COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE

4 - Demonstrates command of a variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout the essay; resolves issues of complex or contested usage.

3 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout most of the essay.

2 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout sections of the essay.

1 - Demonstrates some command of proper sentence structure, use of basic phrases (noun, verb) and simple clauses (independent and dependent).


DEMONSTRATE COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH CAPITALIZATION, PUNCTUATION, AND SPELLING

4 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to hyphenation), and spelling consistently throughout the text.

3 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling consistently throughout most of the text.

2 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to semicolon/colon usage), and spelling consistently throughout sections/portions of the text.

1 - Demonstrates some command of the conventions of capitalization (names, beginning of sentence), punctuation (end punctuation, basic comma usage) and spelling.

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Tues, Sept 11

1 -

Read the following links:

General Article - Progressive Movement: 1900 - 1918

Industrialization, Urbanization, and Immigration

The Social Response to Industrialization 

2 -

Take notes in your notebook or type and paste into notebook.  Notes will be graded on a 4 pt scale.

Rubric:

 4 - includes all of the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; includes statistical and numeric data; uses titles to distinguish different topics, titles reflect titles in handout; is neat and organized

3 - includes the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; includes statistical and numeric data; uses titles to distinguish different topics; is neat and organized

2 - includes a list of information, but does not show any evidence of thought or attempt to summarize central ideas and themes; sloppy

1 - smh 

Politics and Government Homework - Due Tuesday, Sept 11

1 -

Define each of the following:

sovereign
aristocrat
 debtors
creditor
laggard
partisan
polarize
implicit
subordinate
civil liberty
regal
tariff
frugal
impunity
embargo
nullify
innocuous



2 -

Click the following link and read.  When you arrive at the article, you may need to click where it says "show full article".

A New Nation

3 -

Take notes in notebook, or type and tape in notebook. Notes will be checked and graded on a 4 pt scale. Be prepared to discuss with a partner tomorrow.

Rubric:

4 - clearly shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses major people mentioned in reading
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses major people mentioned in reading
- demonstrates understanding of most of the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



2 - shows connections
- discusses some of the major people mentioned in reading
- demonstrates understanding two or less of the texts's central ideas
- little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; little or no numeric data; little mention of major events or people
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence


1 - smh

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Democratizing Twentieth Century/Politics and Govt Homework


 DEMOCRATIZING TWENTIETH CENTURY

 For each word:

a) define
b) list part of speech
c) use in a sentence that conveys your understanding the meaning of the word

vanquish
respiratory
meddle
hobnob
treacherous
militant
expropriation
persistence
ordinance
vigilante
tenement
incite
perpetual
jurisdiction
entanglement
municipal
migratory
agitator


POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

 For each word:

a) define
b) list part of speech
c) use in a sentence that conveys your understanding the meaning of the word

debtor
evade
defy
carnage
disaffected
concession
modify
imbed
dispossess
indentured servant
currency
intricate
provincial
redress

Friday, September 7, 2012

This Weekend's Homework

Hello folks,

I will post your homework tomorrow morning by 10 am.

Have a good weekend.


Cope

Thursday, September 6, 2012

Politics and Government Syllabus/Curriculum Map

Course Breakdown:
20% Homework
20% Response Essay
20% Exam/Quizzes
20% Midterm Exam
20% Class Participation 

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE STATE?


SEPTEMBER

Introduction to Mr. Copeland’s History Class

• Political Systems
• Economic Systems
• Political and Economic Ideological Spectrum
• World and U. S. Geography/Current Events


Skills: Note taking, analysis of primary sources, basic social studies content vocabulary, basic geography
Texts: Party Platforms of selected political parties, quotations from selected historic figures
Films: Excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs
Assessments: Quizzes, personal political/economic framework essay

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER – How Democratic is the Constitution?  Who will win the election and why?

• Articles of Confederation
• Shay’s Rebellion
• Constitutional Convention
• Constitution
• Federalism/Anti-Federalism
• Current Events

Skills: Note taking, reading comprehension, content vocabulary, vocabulary, verbal argumentation/discussion
Texts: Invention a Nation by Gore Vidal, A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn
Films: excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs
Assessments: Quizzes, informal writing, current event report, track participation in discussions, response essay: How Democratic is the Constitution, creative short film project

DECEMBER/JANUARY -- What are the “Privileges and Immunities of U. S. Citizenship?”

• Due Process Clause
• Bill of Rights (over-view, initial applicability to the states)
• Baron v. Baltimore (1833)
• Dred Scott Case (1857)
• Fourteenth Amendment, applicability to states (1868)
• Slaughter-House Cases (1873)
• Kelo v. City of New London (2005)

Skills: Note taking, reading comprehension, content vocabulary, vocabulary, verbal argumentation/discussion, written argumentation, evidence gathering to support arguments
Texts: A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn, The Supreme’s Greatest Hits, The Supreme Court, Various Supreme Court Opinions (primary sources)
Films: excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs
Assessments: quizzes, exams track participation in discussions

FEB – How has the Supreme Court been used to Expand and Inhibit Liberty in the United States?

• Freedom of Speech
• Freedom of Religion
• Rights of the Accused
• Reproductive Rights
• Civil Rights
• Current Events

Skills: Note taking, reading comprehension, content vocabulary, vocabulary, verbal argumentation/discussion, evidence gathering to support arguments
Texts: A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn, The Supreme’s Greatest Hits, The Supreme Court, various Supreme Court opinions (primary sources), handouts—analysis of Supreme Court opinions
Films: excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs, Assessments: Quizzes, Lincoln-Douglas debates (build upon verbal and written argumentation skills), current event report, track participation in discussions

MARCH – The “Culture Wars” - The New Left

• Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal
• Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society
• The Counter Culture of the 1960s
• Current Events

Skills: Note taking, reading comprehension, content vocabulary, vocabulary, verbal argumentation/discussion, evidence gathering to support arguments
Texts: A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn, selected handouts—
Films: excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs, Assessments: Quizzes, Exams, response essay, current event report, track participation in discussions


APRIL/MAY – The “Culture Wars” - Rise of Movement Conservatism

• Barry Goldwater and the Conservative Backlash Against the 1960s Counter-culture
• Ronald Reagan, Trickledown Economics and the Conservative 1980s
• Current Events

Skills: Note taking, reading comprehension, content vocabulary, vocabulary, verbal argumentation/discussion, evidence gathering to support arguments
Texts: A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn, The Rise of Southern Republicans, What’s the Matter w Kansas, selected handouts
Films: excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs, Mr. Conservative, Reagan
Assessments: Quizzes, Exams, response essay, current event report, track participation in discussions


JUNE – Final Exams/Presentations

Democratizing 20th Century America Curriculum Map/Syllabus

Course Breakdown:
20% Homework
20% Response Essay
20% Exam/Quizzes
20% Midterm Exam
20% Class Participation 


In this course you will examine the roots of various Twentieth Century political, social, economic and cultural reform movements. For each movement, you will answer a series of essential questions. Through these questions you will gain both a sense of historical context and an understanding of the tactics used by those who sought to bring about greater democracy and equality in the United States.

Essential Questions: Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did? What gains were won? What gains were sought but not won? If the reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?



SEPTEMBER - Introduction to Mr. Copeland’s History Class


• Political Systems
• Economic Systems
• Political and Economic Ideological Spectrum
• World and U. S. Geography

Skills: Note taking, analysis of primary sources
Texts: Party Platforms of selected political parties, quotations from selected historic figures
Films: Excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs
Assessments: Quizzes, personal political/economic framework essay

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER - Democracy and Equality for Women
• The Right to Vote
• The Movement for Birth Control
• Industrialization
• World War I

Skills: content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, argument development for a debate, logic and reasoning
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Women’s America (Kerber, DeHart), Legislating Women’s Morals (Sanger), Comstock Law, Selected Handouts
Films: Iron Jawed Angels, Choices of the Heart
Assessments: Quizzes, Response Essay, Unit Exam, Reproductive Rights Debate


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER – Labor Democratizes America
• The Progressive Era
• The Great Depression
• The New Deal
• The Red Scare

Skills: content vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Who Built America, Roosevelt and the New Deal, Selected Handouts
Films: Native Son, Grapes of Wrath, The Front, Roger and Me, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: Quizzes, Response Essay, Unit Exam



JANUARY/FEBRUARY - Democracy and Equality for African Americans

• World War II
• The Cold War
• The Civil Rights Movement

Skills: vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, organization in writing a formal, academic essay, presentation/power point, public speaking
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), From Slavery to Freedom (Franklin), Movements of the New Left (Goss)
Films: Eyes on the Prize, Battle for America’s Schools, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: Quizzes, final exam, independent/group research project



MARCH – Democracy and Equality for Youth


• The Cold War
• Student Movement
• Anti-War Movement/Vietnam War
• Rise of the New Left

Skills: vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, discerning author bias
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), The Children (Halberstam), Movements of the New Left (Goss)
Films: Two Days in October, Summer of Love, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: Quizzes, Unit Exam, Response Essay





APRIL/MAY – Pluralistic America
• The Cold War
• Black Power Movement
• Latino Cultural Liberation
• Women’s Liberation
• American Indian Cultural Liberation
• Gay and Lesbian Liberation

Skills: vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, discerning author bias

Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), The Children (Halberstam), Movements of the New Left (Goss), Stonewall (Duberman), Columbus to Castro (Williams)
Films: The Education of Sonny Carson, Malcolm X, Milk, Yo Soy Boriqua, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: quizzes, unit exam, group project and independent research paper



JUNE – NEW LEFT GROUP PRESENTATIONS

Vocabulary Homework

For each term write:

a) part of speech (noun, verb, adj, etc)
b) definition
c) sentence using the word; sentence should demonstrate that you understand the meaning of the word

Democratizing Twentieth Century

jingoism
indignation
sober
stately
matron
besmirch
vagrancy
indict
imperial
pallid
eloquent

Politics and Government

For each term write:

a) part of speech (noun, verb, adj, etc)
b) definition
c) sentence using the word; sentence should demonstrate that you understand the meaning of the word

incensed
commissary
passive
recalcitrant
contingent
cognizant
avarice
profiteer
embolden
grievance
furlough
mutiny
ignominious
consternation
imprudent/prudent
hoard
surly