Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Wednesday, Jan 4

1 - Read the entire packet: Labor Democratizes America. Annotate and take notes. Notes will be graded on a four pt scale:


4 - includes all of the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; includes statistical and numeric data; uses titles to distinguish different topics, titles reflect titles in handout; is neat and organized

3 - includes the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; includes statistical and numeric data; uses titles to distinguish different topics; is neat and organized

2 - includes a list of information, but does not show any evidence of thought or attempt to summarize central ideas and themes; sloppy

1 - ?



2 - Read Zinn Read Zinn 398-406

Indentify:

John Lewis

1. Discuss Louis Adamic's account of an early sit-down strike.

2. Discuss the expansion of sitdown strikes in 1936.

3. What does Zinn think about the Wagner Act? Provide evidence.

4. Discuss Zinn's feelings about the National Labor Relations Board.

5. Discuss the argument made by Cloward and Piven in the book Poor People's Movements.

6. How did WWII impact the Labor Movement?

7. How did the New Deal impact African Americans?

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Politics and Government HW - Due Wed, Jan 4

1) Write each of the following in notebook or print, cut out and paste into notebook. Pick any 10 and use each in a sentence.

immunities: protection or exemption from something, esp. an obligation or penalty:
"immunity from prosecution"

emancipated: Set free, esp. from legal, social, or political restrictions: "the citizen must be emancipated from obsessive government secrecy".

subordinate: Lower in rank or position: "his subordinate officers".

consequently: As a result.

erroneous: (adj) Wrong; incorrect.

expansionist: (adj) of or involving or guided by expansionism; a policy of expansion, as of territory or currency: the colonial expansionism of Europe in the 19th century.

rendered: (v) Provide (a service).
Give (help).

unwieldy: (adj) Difficult to carry or move because of its size, shape, or weight: "the first mechanical clocks were large and unwieldy".

(of a system or bureaucracy) Too big or badly organized to function efficiently.

cumbrous: (adj) cumbersome: difficult to handle or use especially because of size or weight; "a cumbersome piece of machinery";

precedent: (n) An earlier event or action regarded as an example or guide to be considered in subsequent similar circumstances.

novelty: (n) The quality of being new, original, or unusual.
A new or unfamiliar thing or experience.

exposition: (n) A comprehensive description and explanation of an idea or theory.
The part of a movement, esp. in sonata form, in which the principal themes are first presented.

mandamus: (n) A judicial writ issued as a command to an inferior court or ordering a person to perform a public or statutory duty: "a writ of mandamus".

consequent: (adj) Following as a result or effect.

writ: (n) A form of written command in the name of a court or other legal authority to act, or abstain from acting, in some way.

appellate: (adj) (typically of a court) Concerned with or dealing with applications for decisions to be reversed.


clause: (n) A particular and separate article, stipulation, or proviso in a treaty, bill, or contract.

enumerate: (v) Mention (a number of things) one by one.
Establish the number of.

criterion: (v) A principle or standard by which something may be judged or decided: "violating safety criteria".

repugnant: (adj) Extremely distasteful; unacceptable.
In conflict with; incompatible with.

illimitable: (adj) without limits in extent or size or quantity; "limitless vastness of our solar system".

expound: (v) Present and explain (a theory or idea) systematically and in detail.
Explain the meaning of (a literary or doctrinal work).

indictment: (n) A formal charge or accusation of a serious crime: "an indictment for conspiracy".
The action of indicting or being indicted.

insubordination: (n) defiance of authority.

confirmatory: (adj) To support or establish the certainty or validity of; verify.

impassioned: (adj) Filled with or showing great emotion.

disparage: (v) Regard or represent as being of little worth

solemn: (adj) Formal and dignified. Not cheerful or smiling; serious.

conscription (n) Compulsory enlistment for state service, typically into the military.

conspiracy: (n) A secret plan by a group to do something unlawful or harmful.
The action of plotting or conspiring.

stringent: (adj) (of regulations, requirements, or conditions) Strict, precise, and exacting.

injunction: (n) An authoritative warning or order. A judicial order that restrains a person from effecting legal action, or orders redress to an injured party.

hindrance: (n) A thing that provides resistance, delay, or obstruction to something or someone.

encroachment: (n) To take another's possessions or rights gradually or stealthily: encroach on a neighbor's land.
2. To advance beyond proper or former limits: desert encroaching upon grassland.

dictatorial: (adj) Of or typical of a ruler with total power. Having or showing a tendency to tell people what to do in an autocratic way.

statutory: (adj) Required, permitted, or enacted by statute: "the courts did award statutory damages to each of the plaintiffs".
(of a criminal offense) Carrying a penalty prescribed by statute: "statutory theft".

quash: (v) Reject as invalid, esp. by legal procedure: "his conviction was quashed on appeal".
Put an end to; suppress: "a hospital executive quashed rumors that nursing staff will lose jobs".

parliamentary: (adj) Relating to, enacted by, or suitable for a parliament.

impairment: (n) To cause to diminish, as in strength, value, or quality

utterance: (n) A spoken word, statement, or vocal sound.
The action of saying or expressing something aloud: "the simple utterance of a few platitudes".

inimical: (adj) Tending to obstruct or harm: "actions inimical to our interests".
Unfriendly; hostile.

imperative: (adj) Of vital importance; necessary; crucial.



2) Read the packet Supreme's Greatest Hits. Take notes. Notes will be graded on a four point scale:

4 - includes all the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; uses titles to distinguish different topics; includes content specific vocabulary and any new level 2 vocabulary; is neat and organized

3 - includes most of the text's central ideas; mentions important people, institutions, governmental entities and events; uses titles to distinguish different topics; includes content specific vocabulary and any new level 2 vocabulary; is neat and organized

2 - includes a list of information, but does not show any evidence of thought or attempt to summarize central ideas and themes; sloppy

1 - ?



3) A - Read Exploring Constitutional Conflicts: Judicial Review.

B - Based upon the handout on judicial review, answer the questions:

1. Is judicial review a good idea? Should nine unelected judges be able to tell our elected representatives what they can and cannot do?
2. Are courts more likely to block an enlightened consensus with their adherence to outdated principles or to protect the politically weak from oppressive majorities?
3. Are judges, protected with lifetime tenure and drawn generally from the educated class, more likely to be reflective and above the passing enthusiasms that drive legislative action?
4. Does Marbury mean that legislators or members of the executive branch have no responsibility to judge the constitutionality of their own actions?
5. Could we have a workable system of government without judicial review?


4) Based on the handout, construct a case analysis for Dred Scott case. (Analysis will be graded on a 4 pt scale) Case analysis should:

-include facts of case (a summary of what happened before the case was taken to the Supreme Court)
-state constitutional question
-mention any legal rules that were developed as a result of the ruling
-include discussion of majority opinion
-address dissenting opinion if available
-include a reflection and your opinion

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework due Monday, Dec 19

Read 388-399



1) Take notes on the text in your notebook or type and tape into notebook. (Notes will be graded on a 4 point scale)

2) Notes should identify the text's central ideas and discuss the following:

National Textile Workers Union
WWI Bonus Army
Stock Market Crash 1929
Grapes of Wrath
WWI Bonus Army
NRA
TVA
AAA

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Thursday, Dec 15

Read Zinn Chap 15 pg 377-387


In our next two units we will investigate the Labor Movement and the Civil Rights Movement. As you read I would like you to consider the questions: Why then? Why did the Labor Movement get underway when it did?

1) Take notes on the text in your notebook or type and tape into notebook. (Notes will be graded on a 4 point scale)

2) Notes should identify the text's central ideas and discuss the following:

Seattle General Strike
Establishment's Reaction to the Seattle Strike
Excerpt from The Nation
Immigration and Labor/Strikes/Strike Breaking
U. S. Policy Toward Immigrants during the 1920s
Marcus Garvey
Distribution of Wealth During the 1920s
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Sinclair Lewis
Fiorello La Guardia
stretch-out

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Wednesday, Dec 14

Based upon the two articles read in class:

a) What are the central ideas?

b) What is "Plan B"?

c) What is the controversy surrounding Plan B?

d) Should Plan B be available to all women regardless of age? Why or why not?

Monday, December 12, 2011

Politics and Government - Some Argument Supports

Here are some pieces that you can use if you arguing the constitution was undemocratic:

- tolerance of slavery

- lack of voting rights for women, African American and Native Americans

- Electoral College

- Representation in the Senate

- Election of the Senate

- Judicial Review

These are based on arguments from "How Democratic is the Constitution?" by Robert Dahl

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Tuesday, Dec 13

Consider the Margaret Sanger essay "Women and the New Race" and the article and clips we watched about the male birth control pill.

In several paragraphs discuss how you think Sanger would have felt about the male birth control pill. Use evidence from the Women and the New Race and your class notes on the article and film. Your reflection will be graded on a four point scale.

Politics and Government Homework - Due Tuesday, Dec 13

1 - Read the handout "Decent, Even Though Democratic"

2 - Take notes in your notebooks or type and tape into notebook. (notes will be graded on a 4 point scale)

3 - Also for homework credit:

4 - Identity two quotes or pieces of information that you can reference in your essay. Explain how they connect to a particular argument.

5 - How would you describe this author's point of view? Why?

Argument construction, Using two sources in one paragraph

Claim: The Founding Fathers sought to create a government that protected property rights and individuals of wealth more than civil liberties and common people.

Reason:

• A major focus of the Philadelphia convention was to improve the commercial and economic climate amongst the states by strengthening the Articles of Confederation.

The framers of the Constitution were alarmed by the democratic elements of the assemblies in the individual states. Some states pushed for reforms that reduced the economic power wielded by the ruling class. Historian Gordon Wood sympathizes with the elites in his essay How Democratic is the Constitution, describing such reforms as “unjust, [because they] included paper money acts, stay laws, and other forms of debtor relief legislation [that] hurt individual creditor groups in the society and violated individual property rights.” Moreover, of the fifty-five men who attended the Philadelphia convention, most were men of wealth and half had money loaned out at interest.

1 - Background and Context

2 - Introduction of quote

3 - Quote

4 - Analysis or additional related/supporting evidence


- Quote analysis sentence starters:

- Therefore, it can be argued that,

- In other words this quote suggests that,

- In a sense these authors are saying

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Politics and Government Homework - Due Friday, December 9

- Read the entire packet "Democracy and the Constitution"
- Take notes/outline in notebooks
- Notes will be graded on a four point scale

Monday, December 5, 2011

Politics and Government Homework - Due Tuesday, Dec 6

Please read the government packet I handed out today.

Answer the following questions:

1. What is the difference between a republic and a democracy?

2. Explain the difference between inherent, delegated and implied powers.

3. Explain the difference between reserved and concurrent powers.

4. When was the number of House members fixed? Why do you think this was done?

5. Who is third in line to be president?

6. Why is work done in committees first?

7. List three responsibilities the Senate has that the House does not?

8. What is the 22nd amendment? How might one argue that it strengthens democracy? How might one argue that it's anti-democratic?

9. Which cabinet positions have been added since Washington's presidency?

Saturday, December 3, 2011

Politics and Government Homework Due Monday, Dec 5

If you have not read and made notes for chap 7, please do so. Notes will be graded on a four point scale.

For each of the following statements, please select 2 pieces of evidence from Vidal (chap 1-7) to support:

The legislative branch was designed to inhibit democracy.


Alexander Hamilton was more concerned about the men of property than the common man.


The Alien and Sedition Acts demonstrate the anti-democratic inclinations of the Federalist Party.

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework Due Monday, Dec 5

Read the following articles. For each take notes in notebook or tape typed notes into notebook. Homework will be graded on a four point scale.

Griswold v Connecticut

Roe v Wade

Planned Parenthood v Casey

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Mon, Nov 28

Read "Controlling Reproduction"

Take notes. If you type your notes please tape into notebook. Your notes will be graded on a 4 point scale. See rubric below:


4 - clearly shows connections to the Essential Question: Why Then? Why did the Birth Control Movement get underway when it did?

- discusses connections to industrialization and immigration
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and well organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence


3 - shows connections to the Essential Question: Why Then? Why did the Birth Control Movement get underway when it did?

- discusses connections to industrialization and immigration
- discusses key/important events
- demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

2 - shows some connections to the Essential Question: Why Then? Why did the Birth Control Movement get underway when it did?

- discusses connections to industrialization and immigration
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- attempted to organize notes; notes contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

1 - -______-

Politics and Government Homework - Due Monday, Nov 28

Read chapter 6 in Vidal.

Take notes. If you type your notes please tape into notebook. Your notes will be graded on a 4 point scale. See rubric below

Rubric Chap 6

4 - clearly shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses John Adams, Abagail Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, John Marshall, Talleyrand, and the role of the president's cabinet; discusses foreign policy divisions, the characters' attitudes about France and Napoleon, the characters' attitudes about each other, checks and balances, The XYZ Affair and the VA and KY Resolutions
- discusses Vidal's views on democracy and the Constitution
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and well organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

3 - shows some connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses John Adams, Abagail Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, John Marshall, Talleyrand, and the role of the president's cabinet; discusses foreign policy divisions, the characters' attitudes about France and Napoleon, the characters' attitudes about each other, checks and balances, The XYZ Affair and the VA and KY Resolutions
- discusses Vidal's views on democracy and the Constitution
- discusses key/important events
- demonstrates understanding of most of the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and well organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

2 - shows few connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses John Adams, Abagail Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, John Marshall, Talleyrand, and the role of the president's cabinet; discusses foreign policy divisions, the characters' attitudes about France and Napoleon, the characters' attitudes about each other, checks and balances, The XYZ Affair and the VA and KY Resolutions
- does not discuss Vidal's views on democracy and the Constitution
- does not discuss key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are fairly sloppy and and unorganized; notes do not contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

1 - -____-

Friday, November 25, 2011

Politics and Government Response Essay - Due Fri, Dec 23

Response Essay

For the past two months we have been examining the roots of our republic. Conventional wisdom suggests that our republic is democratic in nature, reflecting the democratic impulses of our "founding fathers". Historians such as Howard Zinn seem to challenge this notion. Others, such as Gore Vidal, have more nuanced views.

You will write a formal essay that demonstrates your understanding of class texts, lectures, and discussions. Your essay should be 5 pages, typed, double spaced, 12 pt font. In this essay you will construct an argument that responds to the following question:

Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?

Your paper should discuss at least one of the following:

- The distinct feelings about revolution and democracy held by the "Founding Fathers"

- The structure of the government and the significant functions of each branch.

- The manner in which different "Founding Fathers" implemented the new Constitution; the way they used their roles in government to shape domestic and foreign policy.




Your paper should contain evidence from the following sources:

A) Inventing a Nation by Gore Vidal

B) "A Kind of Revolution" by Howard Zinn

C) any 3 of the following essays: Why We the People by Linda Monk, James Madison and the Constitution by Jack Racove, The Antifederalists: The Other Founders of the American Constitutional Tradition? by Saul Cornell, George Washington and the Constitution by Theodore J. Crackel, Ordinary Americans and the Constitution by Gary B. Nash, Race and the American Constitution: A Struggle towards National Ideals by James O. Horton

D) At least 2 of the following:

- Democracy and the Constitution by Gordon Wood

- The Constitution as an Elitist Document by Michael Perenti

- Decent, Even Though Democratic by Ann Stuart Diamond

E) Who Built America? pgs TBA (This is a class reference text. You must use workshop time in class to gather evidence from this book. You may not take it home.)

F) Class notes on lectures, films, discussions, and Constitution Center Field Trip




Rubric for Essay

HISTORICAL CONTENT

16 - Demonstrates a clear and sophisticated understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding several of the framers and the Constitution

12 - Demonstrates a clear understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding several of the framers and the Constitution

8 - Demonstrates some understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; attempts to discusses the opinions and arguments presented by one or two historians regarding one or two of the framers and the Constitution

4 - Demonstrates little or no understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; does not discusses the opinions and arguments presented by historians regarding the framers and the Constitution; provides a summary of events without making an argument


INTRODUCTION, DISTINCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PRECISE CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS

4 - Introduces, distinguishes and develops precise claims and counterclaims throughout the entire essay to create a strong and nuanced argument; cites strong and thorough evidence from A-F above.

3 - States a precise claim that is developed throughout the entire essay; provides relevant and thorough evidence from of A-F; evaluates claim against some counterclaims.

2 - States a claim that is developed throughout much of the essay; provides relevant evidence from several of A-F.

1 - Provides some information, details, and/or evidence related to claim but does not state a claim.


USE OF SPECIFIC LANGUAGE AND VARIED SYNTAX TO LINK CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS, AND EVIDENCE

4 - Uses a variety of specific transitional words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims and/or evidence. Appropriately incorporates new vocabulary learned in this unit.

3 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

2 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

1 - Uses simple words/phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.


OBSERVATION AND MAINTENANCE OF APPROPRIATE TONE, STYLE, NORMS AND CONVENTIONS


4 - Observes and maintains objective tone and formal style throughout the entire essay while attending to the norms and conventions of a history essay. Discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution


3 - Observes and maintains relevant tone and style throughout the entire essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a history essay in most of the essay. Discusses the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution.

2 - Uses relevant tone and style consistently throughout sections/portions of the essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a social studies essay in specific paragraphs or sections of the essay. Attempts to discuss the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution

1 - Uses relevant style and tone sporadically; fails to attend to the norms of a social studies essay in specific sentences or specific portions of the essay. Fails to discuss the opinions and arguments presented by different historians regarding the framers and the Constitution


PROVISION OF RELEVANT CONCLUDING STATEMENT

4 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument while extending insight and/or prescribing further relevant action

3 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument

2 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports several of the major claims of the argument

1 - Provides a concluding statement that is somewhat relevant to the argument presented


ABILITY TO DEMONSTRATE A COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE

4 - Demonstrates command of a variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout the essay; resolves issues of complex or contested usage.

3 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout most of the essay.

2 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout sections of the essay.

1 - Demonstrates some command of proper sentence structure, use of basic phrases (noun, verb) and simple clauses (independent and dependent).


DEMONSTRATE COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH CAPITALIZATION, PUNCTUATION, AND SPELLING

4 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to hyphenation), and spelling consistently throughout the text.

3 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling consistently throughout most of the text.

2 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to semicolon/colon usage), and spelling consistently throughout sections/portions of the text.

1 - Demonstrates some command of the conventions of capitalization (names, beginning of sentence), punctuation (end punctuation, basic comma usage) and spelling.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century HW - Due Mon, Nov 14

There will be a considerable amount of workshop time in class for the essay this week. You should come prepared to work. Bring all of your notes and a flash drive (I will try to get computers and/or mobile labs at least once). The paper will be due on Nov 22.

This weekend, do one or more of the following:

- Think about what you are stuck on in particular so you can make it clear to me. Is it a thesis? Arguments? Evidence? Getting started?

- Start making an outline for your paper.

- If you are having trouble getting started, think about a person or event from this unit that you found the most interesting. Gather all of your notes and make a list of facts and ideas regarding the person or event.



Sample Thesis:


Claim
- The Industrial Revolution provoked the social, economic and cultural changes that incentivized the Women's Suffrage Movement.

Reasons:

- The increased need for labor during the Industrial Revolution helped the pull women from the domestic sphere into the public sphere, where they increased their impact on politics as part of the labor movement.

- The Industrial Revolution prompted a surge in socialism. Socialist organizations provided suffragists with organizational support.

- Women used their traditional domestic roles to address the chaos brought about by industrialization.


Sample Thesis:

Claim
- The spirit of reform that swept America during the Progressive Era helped to spark the Women's Suffrage Movement.



Sample Thesis:

Claim
- The Women's Suffrage Movement arose from increased educational and political opportunities for women.


Sample Thesis:

Claim
- World War I created a political, economic and cultural climate that made voting rights for women attainable.

Monday, November 7, 2011

Politics and Government Homework - Due Monday, November 14

1 - Define the following words. List part of speech and use each in a sentence. (* no sentence required)

unscrupulous
indelible
encumbered
etiolating: to make pale; to deprive of natural vigor, make feeble
intrepid
megalomania
in posse*: in potential but not in actuality.
in esse*: actually existing
cohere
remuneration
locution
arbiter
ambivalence
venery*: sexual indulgence
peripatetic
bemuse
at par
platonic*
parricide*: the act of murdering one's father (patricide), mother (matricide) or other close relative, but usually not children (infanticide).
the act of murdering a person (such as the ruler of one's country) who stands in a relationship resembling that of a father
a person who commits such an act
mortify
apostate
vexing dexterity
amoral
concomitant
votary
phalanx*
usurp
approbation
machination
pseudonym
candor
epitaph
candor
obstinate
ardent
nimbus*
adroit
chrub
pagan
belligerent
jingo
prescience
antipathy
unilateral
felicity
querulous




2 - Read Chapters 4 and 5 in Vidal

Take notes. If you type your notes please tape into notebook. Your notes will be graded on a 4 point scale. There will be a separate grade for each chapter. See rubric below




Rubric Chap 4

4 - clearly shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Henry Knox, James Madison, Senator Maclay and the role of the president's cabinet; discusses foreign policy divisions, the characters' attitudes about the government, the characters' attitudes about each other, checks and balances, The Assumption
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and well organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Henry Knox, James Madison, Senator Maclay and the role of the president's cabinet; discusses foreign policy divisions, the characters' attitudes about the government, the characters' attitudes about each other, checks and balances, The Assumption
- discusses key/important events
- demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



2 - shows some connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses several of, but not all of the following: John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Henry Knox, James Madison, Senator Maclay and the role of the president's cabinet; discusses foreign policy divisions, the characters' attitudes about the government, the characters' attitudes about each other, checks and balances, The Assumption
- discusses key/important events
- demonstrates some understanding of the text's central ideas
- provides some evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes show some organization; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



1 - is you serious?

Thursday, November 3, 2011

yes. it's true. the test is monday.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Democratizining Twentieth America Exam Review Term

Required Readings: Zinn, Industrializing America, Battle for Suffrage

Espionage Act
American Protective League
Green Corn Rebellion
Jeanette Rankin
Kate Richards O'Hare
IWW Trials
Palmer Raids
Sacco and Vanzetti
Seneca Falls Convention
women's education/college
Grover Cleveland
Anna Garlin Spencer
Carrie Chapmann Catt
Alice Paul
Woodrow Wilson/Women's Suffrage
Woodrow Wilson/WWI
CPI
Fourteen Points
Nineteenth Amendment
anarcho-syndicalism
IWW (I know you did this term before, you must do it again)
free speech fights
The Preacher and the Slave
Joe Hill
Lawrence, MA (I expect a detailed discussion of these events)**
difference between the AFL and IWW
"One Big Union"
Rules for Female Teachers
Mark Twain
Upton Sinclair
Muckraker
J. P. Morgan, J. D. Rockefeller
Taylorism
Immigration and the Labor Force
Triangle Shirtwaist Company
International Ladies Garment Workers
Unionization/AFL
Samuel Gompers
Big Bill Heywood
IWW
mainstream reason cited for U.S. entry into WWI
unrestricted submarine warfare
Monroe Doctrine
Panama Canal
Spanish American War
The Jungle
19th amendment

People to know:
Alice Paul
Woodrow Wilson
Upton Sinclair
Jane Addams
Mary Harris
William McKinley
7. Mother Mary Jones
8. Ida Tarbell
9. Kate Richards O’Hare
10. J. P. Morgan
11. Andrew Carnegie
12. Eugene Debbs
13. Samuel Gompers
14. Carrie Chapman Catt
15. Emma Goldman
16. Helen Keller
17. Mary Elizabeth Lease

Terms/Concepts to know and understand:

1. muckraker
2. Silent Sentinel
3. Marxist
4. scab labor
5. collective bargaining
6. imperialism
7. Taylorism
8. Reformist Motherhood
9. Political Motherhood
10. Republican Mothers
11. Socialist Woman

Organizations to know:
1. NAWSA
2. AFL
3. WP
4. IWW
5. WCTU

Monday, October 31, 2011

Politics and Government Homework Due - Tues, Nov 1

Unit 1 - Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?


Construct a "Harvard Style" outline to deconstruct the central ideas in pages 43-53.

Your outline should cover at least these themes:

-comparison of Britain and the United States
-Franklin's prediction
-roots of the American Party System
-differing opinions about government
-property and democracy

I'll grade this on a 1-4 point scale, basically based on the rubric from the weekend's homework.


I. Central idea, declarative statement about the text

A. Supporting idea; person, concept or event

1. evidence/reasons

2. evidence/reasons

3. evidence/reasons


B. Supporting idea, person, or concept or event

1. evidence/reasons

2. evidence/reasons

3. evidence/reasons

and so on...

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Tues, Nov 1

Unit 1 - Democracy and Equality for Women: Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?


World War I

In one of the preceding video clips it was mentioned that Woodrow Wilson pursued a policy of "liberal internationalism", which is essentially the idea that the U.S. should use involve itself in the affairs of the international community as a means to promote "liberal" values. This policy included the promotion of a people's right to self determination and "making the world safe for democracy."

- self determination: the principle in international law that nations have the right to freely choose their sovereignty and international political status with no external compulsion or external interference

Assignment

1) Read and take notes on this excerpt about the Treaty of Versailles:

TREATY OF VERSAILLES

Viewing Germany as the chief instigator of the conflict, the European Allied Powers decided to impose particularly stringent treaty obligations upon the defeated Germany. The Treaty of Versailles, presented for German leaders to sign on May 7, 1919, forced Germany to concede territories to Belgium (Eupen-Malm├ędy), Czechoslovakia (the Hultschin district), and Poland (Poznan [German: Posen], West Prussia and Upper Silesia). The Germans returned Alsace and Lorraine, annexed in 1871 after the Franco-Prussian War, to France. All German overseas colonies became League of Nation Mandates, and the city of Danzig (today: Gdansk), with its large ethnically German population, became a Free City. The treaty demanded demilitarization and occupation of the Rhineland, and special status for the Saarland under French control. Plebiscites were to determine the future of areas in northern Schleswig on the Danish-German frontier and parts of Upper Silesia on the border with Poland.

Perhaps the most humiliating portion of the treaty for defeated Germany was Article 231, commonly known as the "War Guilt Clause," which forced the German nation to accept complete responsibility for initiating World War I. As such Germany was liable for all material damages, and France's premier Georges Clemenceau particularly insisted on imposing enormous reparation payments. Aware that Germany would probably not be able to pay such a towering debt, Clemenceau and the French nevertheless greatly feared rapid German recovery and the initiation of a new war against France. Hence, the French sought in the postwar treaty to limit Germany's potential to regain its economic superiority and to rearm. The German army was to be limited to 100,000 men, and conscription proscribed; the treaty restricted the Navy to vessels under 100,000 tons, with a ban on the acquisition or maintenance of a submarine fleet.

Moreover, Germany was forbidden to maintain an air force. Finally, Germany was required to conduct war crimes proceedings against the Kaiser and other leaders for waging aggressive war. The subsequent Leipzig Trials, without the Kaiser or other significant national leaders in the dock, resulted largely in acquittals and were widely perceived as a sham, even in Germany.

The newly formed German democratic government saw the Versailles Treaty as a “dictated peace” (Diktat). Although France, which had suffered more materially than the other parties in the “Big Four,” had insisted upon harsh terms, the peace treaty did not ultimately help to settle the international disputes which had initiated World War I. On the contrary, it tended to hinder inter-European cooperation and make more fractious the underlying issues which had caused the war in the first place. The dreadful sacrifices of war and tremendous loss of life, suffered on all sides, weighed heavily not only upon the losers of the conflict, but also upon those combatants on the winning side, like Italy, whose postwar spoils seemed incommensurate with the terrible price each nation had paid in blood and material goods.

For the populations of the defeated powers -- Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Bulgaria -- the respective peace treaties appeared an unfair punishment, and their governments, whether democratic as in Germany or Austria, or authoritarian, in the case of Hungary and Bulgaria, quickly resorted to violating the military and financial terms of the accords. Efforts to revise and defy the more burdensome provisions of the peace became a key element in their respective foreign policies and proved a destabilizing factor in international politics.

The war guilt clause, its incumbent reparation payments, and the limitations on the German military were particularly onerous in the minds of most Germans, and revision of the Versailles Treaty represented one of the platforms that gave radical right wing parties in Germany, including Hitler's Nazi Party, such credibility to mainstream voters in the 1920s and early 1930s. Promises to rearm, to reclaim German territory, particularly in the East, to remilitarize the Rhineland, and to regain prominence again among the European and world powers after such a humiliating defeat and peace, stoked ultranationalist sentiment and helped average voters to overlook the more radical tenets of Nazi ideology.

The burdensome reparations, coupled with a general inflationary period in Europe in the 1920s, caused spiraling hyperinflation of the German Reichsmark by 1923. This hyperinflationary period combined with the effects of the Great Depression (beginning in 1929) seriously to undermine the stability of the German economy, wiping out the personal savings of the middle class and spurring massive unemployment. Such economic chaos did much to increase social unrest, destabilizing the fragile Weimar Republic.

Finally, the efforts of the Western European powers to marginalize Germany through the Versailles Treaty undermined and isolated German democratic leaders. Particularly deleterious in connection with the harsh provisions of Versailles was the rampant conviction among many in the general population that Germany had been “stabbed in the back” by the “November criminals” -- those who had helped to form the new Weimar government and broker the peace which Germans had so desperately wanted, but which ended so disastrously in Versailles. Many Germans forgot that they had applauded the fall of the Kaiser, had initially welcomed parliamentary democratic reform, and had rejoiced at the armistice. They recalled only that the German Left -- Socialists, Communists and Jews, in common imagination -- had surrendered German honor to an ignominious peace when no foreign armies had even set foot on German soil.

This Dolchstosslegende (stab-in-the-back legend) helped further to discredit German socialist and liberal circles who felt most committed to maintain Germany's fragile democratic experiment. The difficulties imposed by social and economic unrest in the wake of World War I and its onerous peace terms worked in tandem to undermine pluralistic democratic solutions in Weimar Germany and to increase public longing for more authoritarian direction, a kind of leadership which German voters ultimately and unfortunately found in Adolf Hitler and his National Socialist Party.


2) Read and analyze this excerpt from Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points Speech. Consider questions you can ask yourself about the text to help with your notes and understanding of the central ideas.

Rubric for notes:

4 - Discusses the document's central ideas including the politics and geographic implications of Wilson's plan for the postwar world and the rationale for his choices.

- includes evidence/quotes from the document

- makes connections to the unit's essential question

- includes numeric and/or statistical data

- shows a consideration for the time period and its impact the document's contents

- is neat and organized; contains headings that distinguish central ideas and numbers, bullets etc to show supporting ideas and evidence






Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points Speech (January 8, 1918)

"It will be our wish and purpose that the processes of peace, when they are begun, shall be absolutely open and that they shall involve and permit henceforth no secret understandings of any kind. The day of conquest and aggrandizement is gone by; so is also the day of secret covenants entered into in the interest of particular governments and likely at some unlooked-for moment to upset the peace of the world. It is this happy fact, now clear to the view of every public man whose thoughts do not still linger in an age that is dead and gone, which makes it possible for every nation whose purposes are consistent with justice and the peace of the world to avow nor or at any other time the objects it has in view.

We entered this war because violations of right had occurred which touched us to the quick and made the life of our own people impossible unless they were corrected and the world secure once for all against their recurrence. What we demand in this war, therefore, is nothing peculiar to ourselves. It is that the world be made fit and safe to live in; and particularly that it be made safe for every peace-loving nation which, like our own, wishes to live its own life, determine its own institutions, be assured of justice and fair dealing by the other peoples of the world as against force and selfish aggression. All the peoples of the world are in effect partners in this interest, and for our own part we see very clearly that unless justice be done to others it will not be done to us. The program of the world's peace, therefore, is our program; and that program, the only possible program, as we see it, is this:

I. Open covenants of peace, openly arrived at, after which there shall be no private international understandings of any kind but diplomacy shall proceed always frankly and in the public view.

II. Absolute freedom of navigation upon the seas, outside territorial waters, alike in peace and in war, except as the seas may be closed in whole or in part by international action for the enforcement of international covenants.

III. The removal, so far as possible, of all economic barriers and the establishment of an equality of trade conditions among all the nations consenting to the peace and associating themselves for its maintenance.

IV. Adequate guarantees given and taken that national armaments will be reduced to the lowest point consistent with domestic safety.

V. A free, open-minded, and absolutely impartial adjustment of all colonial claims, based upon a strict observance of the principle that in determining all such questions of sovereignty the interests of the populations concerned must have equal weight with the equitable claims of the government whose title is to be determined.

VI. The evacuation of all Russian territory and such a settlement of all questions affecting Russia as will secure the best and freest cooperation of the other nations of the world in obtaining for her an unhampered and unembarrassed opportunity for the independent determination of her own political development and national policy and assure her of a sincere welcome into the society of free nations under institutions of her own choosing; and, more than a welcome, assistance also of every kind that she may need and may herself desire. The treatment accorded Russia by her sister nations in the months to come will be the acid test of their good will, of their comprehension of her needs as distinguished from their own interests, and of their intelligent and unselfish sympathy.

VII. Belgium, the whole world will agree, must be evacuated and restored, without any attempt to limit the sovereignty which she enjoys in common with all other free nations. No other single act will serve as this will serve to restore confidence among the nations in the laws which they have themselves set and determined for the government of their relations with one another. Without this healing act the whole structure and validity of international law is forever impaired.

VIII. All French territory should be freed and the invaded portions restored, and the wrong done to France by Prussia in 1871 in the matter of Alsace-Lorraine, which has unsettled the peace of the world for nearly fifty years, should be righted, in order that peace may once more be made secure in the interest of all.

IX. A readjustment of the frontiers of Italy should be effected along clearly recognizable lines of nationality.

X. The peoples of Austria-Hungary, whose place among the nations we wish to see safeguarded and assured, should be accorded the freest opportunity to autonomous development.

XI. Rumania, Serbia, and Montenegro should be evacuated; occupied territories restored; Serbia accorded free and secure access to the sea; and the relations of the several Balkan states to one another determined by friendly counsel along historically established lines of allegiance and nationality; and international guarantees of the political and economic independence and territorial integrity of the several Balkan states should be entered into.

XII. The Turkish portion of the present Ottoman Empire should be assured a secure sovereignty, but the other nationalities which are now under Turkish rule should be assured an undoubted security of life and an absolutely unmolested opportunity of autonomous development, and the Dardanelles should be permanently opened as a free passage to the ships and commerce of all nations under international guarantees.

XIII. An independent Polish state should be erected which should include the territories inhabited by indisputably Polish populations, which should be assured a free and secure access to the sea, and whose political and economic independence and territorial integrity should be guaranteed by international covenant.

XIV. A general association of nations must be formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political independence and territorial integrity to great and small states alike.

In regard to these essential rectifications of wrong and assertions of right we feel ourselves to be intimate partners of all the governments and peoples associated together against the Imperialists. We cannot be separated in interest or divided in purpose. We stand together until the end. For such arrangements and covenants we are willing to fight and to continue to fight until they are achieved; but only because we wish the right to prevail and desire a just and stable peace such as can be secured only by removing the chief provocations to war, which this program does remove. We have no jealousy of German greatness, and there is nothing in this program that impairs it. We grudge her no achievement or distinction of learning or of pacific enterprise such as have made her record very bright and very enviable. We do not wish to injure her or to block in any way her legitimate influence or power. We do not wish to fight her either with arms or with hostile arrangements of trade if she is willing to associate herself with us and the other peace- loving nations of the world in covenants of justice and law and fair dealing. We wish her only to accept a place of equality among the peoples of the world, -- the new world in which we now live, -- instead of a place of mastery.

Neither do we presume to suggest to her any alteration or modification of her institutions. But it is necessary, we must frankly say, and necessary as a preliminary to any intelligent dealings with her on our part, that we should know whom her spokesmen speak for when they speak to us, whether for the Reichstag majority or for the military party and the men whose creed is imperial domination.

We have spoken now, surely, in terms too concrete to admit of any further doubt or question. An evident principle runs through the whole program I have outlined. It is the principle of justice to all peoples and nationalities, and their right to live on equal terms of liberty and safety with one another, whether they be strong or weak.

Unless this principle be made its foundation no part of the structure of international justice can stand. The people of the United States could act upon no other principle; and to the vindication of this principle they are ready to devote their lives, their honor, and everything they possess. The moral climax of this the culminating and final war for human liberty has come, and they are ready to put their own strength, their own highest purpose, their own integrity and devotion to the test."


rationale: 1. the fundamental reason or reasons serving to account for something.
2. a statement of reasons.



Source: http://wwi.lib.byu.edu/index.php/President_Wilson%27s_Fourteen_Points

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Exams Next Friday, Nov 4

Both classes will have an exam next week.

Politics and Government:

A Kind of Revolution by Howard Zinn
Inventing a Nation pgs 1-80
History Now Essays
- Why We the People?
- The Anti-Federalists
- Ordinary Americans and the Constitution
Class notes on lectures/discussions


Democratizing Twentieth Century:


The Socialist Challenge, War is the Health of the State by Howard Zinn
Industrializing America by Kerber and De Hart
Selected Readings Packet "Battle for Suffrage"
Class notes on lectures and discussions

Politics and Government Homework - Due Mon, Oct 31

1 - Define the following. For each, list part of speech and write sentences. Words with asterisks do not require sentences. Several words are already defined, but you must still write sentences. A few of these may be repeats so you may write your own definition, provided you're certain of its meaning. You must still use in a sentence.

exuberant: (adj) killed with or characterized by a lively energy and excitement

*brood: (n) a number of young produced or hatched at one time; a family of offspring or young.

*brood: (v) to sit upon (eggs) to hatch, as a bird; incubate.
electorate

brood: (v) to think or worry persistently or moodily about; ponder: He brooded the problem.

*fin de siecle: "end of the century"

*Anglophone: (adj/n) the English speaking world, person, group pr locality

emolument: (n) salary, wages and benefits paid for employment or an office held.

subsist: (v) to continue in existence

nemesis: (n) a source of harm or ruin

ramshackle

feudalism

venality: (n) susceptible to bribery or corruption

dour

dissimilitude: (n) not similar

abhorrent: (adj) detestable, loathsome, inspiring disgust

fret: (v) to feel or express worry, annoyance, discontent, or the like

*lapidary: (n) a cutter, polisher, or engraver of precious stones usually other than diamonds

*Arcadia: A region of ancient Greece in the Peloponnesus. Its inhabitants, relatively isolated from the rest of the known civilized world, proverbially lived a simple, pastoral life

stratagem: (n) a plan or strategy used to trick an enemy

decimate: (v) kill, destroy, or remove a large percentage of

comprise

unfurling

succumb

arduous

nullify

cession

candid

*littoral: (adj) of or pertaining to the shore of a lake, sea, or ocean.

common-law

equipage

ostentatious

*panegyric: (n) a public speech or published text in praise of someone or something.

gape

*eponymous: (adj) of, relating to, or being the person or thing for whom or which something is named

euphoria

incessant

serene

apropos

averse

*antediluvian: (adj) "before the deluge" – is the period referred to in the Bible between the Creation of the Earth and the Deluge (flood)

2 - Read Vidal, Chapter 3. Take notes. Notes will be graded on a 4 point scale.


4 - clearly shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses politics in England and the United States including roots of U.S.'s political divisions, discusses John Adams, Abagail Adams, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, European Renaissance
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence


3 - shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses politics in England and the United States including roots of U.S.'s political divisions, discusses John Adams, Abagail Adams, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, European Renaissance
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

2 - shows few connections
- discusses several but not all of the following: politics in England and the United States including roots of U.S.'s political divisions, discusses John Adams, Abagail Adams, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, European Renaissance
- demonstrates understanding two or less of the text's central ideas; lists information but demonstrates no synthesis of information, lacks central ideas.
- little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; little or no numeric data; little mention of major events or people
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence

1 - you already know

Friday, October 28, 2011

Spring Break Mediterranean Trip

Hey folks. Anyone interested in going on the Spring Break Mediterranean trip should swing by and get info from Shantae asap!!!

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century America - Response Essay Friday, Nov 18

Democratizing America Unit 1 – Democracy and Equality for Women: Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

Response Essay

For the past several weeks we have been studying the Industrial Revolution as a context for understanding how and why women got the right to vote when they did. In this essay, you will discuss the Women's Suffrage Movement. You will demonstrate your understanding of this movement--its roots, its successes and its limitations. You will also demonstrate your understanding of the historic context by discussing the rise of socialism and Progressivism and WWI.

Essential Question: Why then? Why did the Women's Suffrage Movement get underway when it did? (90%)

5 pages typed, double spaced, 12 pt font.

Reflection questions (10%):
1 page typed, double spaced, 12 pt font.

In this essay you must include evidence obtained from the following sources:

a) Howard Zinn - "The Socialist Challenge" and "War is the Health of the State"
b) Kerber, De Hart - "Industrializing America"
c) Who Built America? - "Radicals and Reformers in the Progressive Era" pgs 213-229 "Woman Suffrage", "Factory Reform and the Conditions of Labor", "The Garment Industry and Working Women's Activism", "Socialist, Marxists and Anarchists" **(this book is only available in class and you must use class workshop time to take your notes)
d) Women's Suffrage Packet
e) one reputable outside source

Rubric (seven categories)

HISTORICAL CONTENT


16 - Demonstrates a clear and sophisticated understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses at least 3 of the four causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement and several individuals and/or people involved.

12 - Demonstrates a clear understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discusses at least 3 of the four causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement and several individuals and/or people involved.

8 - Demonstrates an understanding of the historical time period and the cause and effect relationship between significant events; accurately discuss at least 2 of the four causes of the Women's Suffrage Movement and several individuals and/or people involved.

4 - Demonstrates little or no understanding of the historical time period and/or the cause and effect relationships between significant events; inaccurately discusses the Women's Suffrage Movement and/or several individuals involved.


INTRODUCTION, DISTINCTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PRECISE CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS

4 - Introduces, distinguishes and develops precise claims and counterclaims throughout the entire essay to create a strong and nuanced argument; cites strong and thorough evidence from A-E above.

3 - States a precise claim that is developed throughout the entire essay; provides relevant and thorough evidence from of A-E; evaluates claim against some counterclaims.

2 - States a claim that is developed throughout much of the essay; provides relevant evidence from several of A-E.

1 - Provides some information, details, and/or evidence related to claim but does not state a claim.


USE OF SPECIFIC LANGUAGE AND VARIED SYNTAX TO LINK CLAIMS AND COUNTERCLAIMS, AND EVIDENCE

4 - Uses a variety of specific transitional words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims and/or evidence. Appropriately incorporates new vocabulary learned in this unit.

3 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases as well as varied syntax to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

2 - Uses specific transitional words and phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.

1 - Uses simple words/phrases to connect claims, counterclaims, and/or evidence.


OBSERVATION AND MAINTENANCE OF APPROPRIATE TONE, STYLE, NORMS AND CONVENTIONS


4 - Observes and maintains objective tone and formal style throughout the entire essay while attending to the norms and conventions of a history essay.

3 - Observes and maintains relevant tone and style throughout the entire essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a history essay in most of the essay.

2 - Uses relevant tone and style consistently throughout sections/portions of the essay; attends to the norms and conventions of a social studies essay in specific paragraphs or sections of the essay.

1 - Uses relevant style and tone sporadically; attends to the norms of a social studies essay in specific sentences or specific portions of the essay.


PROVISION OF RELEVANT CONCLUDING STATEMENT

4 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument while extending insight and/or prescribing further relevant action

3 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports all of the major claims of the argument

2 - Provides a concluding statement that follows from and supports several of the major claims of the argument

1 - Provides a concluding statement that is somewhat relevant to the argument presented


ABILITY TO DEMONSTRATE A COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND USAGE

4 - Demonstrates command of a variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout the essay; resolves issues of complex or contested usage.

3 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout most of the essay.

2 - Demonstrates command of variety of sentence structures, phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, etc.), and clauses (dependent, relative, etc.) consistently throughout sections of the essay.

1 - Demonstrates some command of proper sentence structure, use of basic phrases (noun, verb) and simple clauses (independent and dependent).


DEMONSTRATE COMMAND OF THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD ENGLISH CAPITALIZATION, PUNCTUATION, AND SPELLING

4 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to hyphenation), and spelling consistently throughout the text.

3 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling consistently throughout most of the text.

2 - Demonstrates command of the conventions of capitalization, punctuation (extends to semicolon/colon usage), and spelling consistently throughout sections/portions of the text.

1 - Demonstrates some command of the conventions of capitalization (names, beginning of sentence), punctuation (end punctuation, basic comma usage) and spelling.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT BAKE SALE

POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT BAKE SALE TOMORROW FOR BOTH HIGH SCHOOL AND MIDDLE SCHOOL!!!!

Monday, October 24, 2011

Poltics and Government HW - Due Tues, Oct 25

Ingenuity: the process of applying ideas to solve problems or meet challenges.

Promulgated: the act of formally proclaiming or declaring a new statutory or administrative law as in effect after it receives final approval.

Parable: a brief, succinct story, in prose or verse, that illustrates a moral or religious lesson.

Tact: consideration in dealing with others and avoiding giving offense

Viable: capable of being done with means at hand and circumstances as they are

Metaphysical: pertaining to or of the nature of metaphysics; "metaphysical philosophy"

Existential: derived from experience or the experience of existence

Demurely: Standards of modesty (also called demureness or reticence) are aspects of the culture of a country or people, at a given point in time, and is a measure against which an individual in society may be judged.

Palladium: a silver-white metallic element of the platinum group that resembles platinum

Invariably: without variation or change, in every case; "constantly kind and gracious"; "he always arrives on time"

Locutions: a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

Plutarch: a lunar impact crater that lies near the north-northeastern limb of the Moon, just to the south of the irregular crater Seneca

Exalted: of high moral or intellectual value; elevated in nature or style; "an exalted ideal"; "argue in terms of high-flown ideals"

Demonstrable: capable of being demonstrated or proved; "obvious lies"; "a demonstrable lack of concern for the general welfare"

Mediocrities: The assumptions of mediocrity principle is the notion in philosophy of science that there is nothing special about humans or the Earth.
Vocab - Copy or tape into notebook. Use each in a sentence


Aide-de-Camp: an officer who acts as military assistant to a more senior officer

Envisaged: form a mental image of something that is not present or that is not the case; "Can you conceive of him as the president?"

Passive: lacking in energy or will

Eminence: high status importance owing to marked superiority; "a scholar of great eminence"

Demagogue: a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular passions and prejudices

Progenitors: an ancestor in the direct line

Dutiful: willingly obedient out of a sense of duty and respect; "a dutiful child"; "a dutiful citizen"

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework - Due Tues, Oct 25

Read Zinn "War is the Health of the State" pages 359-365

Why did Sean Wadsworth propose a draft?

How/why do you think British military requirements changed over time?

How did industrialization impact the nature of war?

What was “no man’s land?”

Discuss the impact of media coverage.

Why did Wilson enter the war?

Discuss the William Jennings Bryant quote: “…opened the doors of all weaker countries to an invasion of American capital and enterprise.
How does this quote connect to the concept of imperialism?

Why did W. E. B. DuBois call the war a "Battle for Africa"?

Compare the Committee on Public Information, the Socialist and the Alliance for Labor and Democracy's stances on the War.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework - Due Monday, Oct 24

Unit 1 - Democracy and Equality for Women - The Right to Vote
Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?


1) Copy into notebooks:

The Four Causes of WWI
nationalism, militarism, secret alliances, imperialism

nationalism: when an ethnic, religious or cultural group feels entitled to its own state.

militarism: when a country's economy and culture is based on the military.

secret alliances: agreements between two or more countries to support each other during war, unbeknownst to other nations.

imperialism: when a country dominates another economically, politically and culturally.

Two sides of WWI

Allies/Triple Entente (Britain, France, Russia, USA)
Central Powers/Triple Alliance (Germany, Ottoman Empire, Austria Hungary)

2) Read:

Summary of Events
The Start of the War

World War I began on July 28, 1914, when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. This seemingly small conflict between two countries spread rapidly: soon, Germany, Russia, Great Britain, and France were all drawn into the war, largely because they were involved in treaties that obligated them to defend certain other nations. Western and eastern fronts quickly opened along the borders of Germany and Austria-Hungary.

The Western and Eastern Fronts

The first month of combat consisted of bold attacks and rapid troop movements on both fronts. In the west, Germany attacked first Belgium and then France. In the east, Russia attacked both Germany and Austria-Hungary. In the south, Austria-Hungary attacked Serbia. Following the Battle of the Marne (September 5–9, 1914), the western front became entrenched in central France and remained that way for the rest of the war. The fronts in the east also gradually locked into place.

The Ottoman Empire

Late in 1914, the Ottoman Empire was brought into the fray as well, after Germany tricked Russia into thinking that Turkey had attacked it. As a result, much of 1915 was dominated by Allied actions against the Ottomans in the Mediterranean. First, Britain and France launched a failed attack on the Dardanelles. This campaign was followed by the British invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula. Britain also launched a separate campaign against the Turks in Mesopotamia. Although the British had some successes in Mesopotamia, the Gallipoli campaign and the attacks on the Dardanelles resulted in British defeats.

Trench Warfare

The middle part of the war, 1916 and 1917, was dominated by continued trench warfare in both the east and the west. Soldiers fought from dug-in positions, striking at each other with machine guns, heavy artillery, and chemical weapons. Though soldiers died by the millions in brutal conditions, neither side had any substantive success or gained any advantage.

The United States’ Entrance and Russia’s Exit

Despite the stalemate on both fronts in Europe, two important developments in the war occurred in 1917. In early April, the United States, angered by attacks upon its ships in the Atlantic, declared war on Germany. Then, in November, the Bolshevik Revolution prompted Russia to pull out of the war.

The End of the War and Armistice

Although both sides launched renewed offensives in 1918 in an all-or-nothing effort to win the war, both efforts failed. The fighting between exhausted, demoralized troops continued to plod along until the Germans lost a number of individual battles and very gradually began to fall back. A deadly outbreak of influenza, meanwhile, took heavy tolls on soldiers of both sides. Eventually, the governments of both Germany and Austria-Hungary began to lose control as both countries experienced multiple mutinies from within their military structures.

The war ended in the late fall of 1918, after the member countries of the Central Powers signed armistice agreements one by one. Germany was the last, signing its armistice on November 11, 1918. As a result of these agreements, Austria-Hungary was broken up into several smaller countries. Germany, under the Treaty of Versailles, was severely punished with hefty economic reparations, territorial losses, and strict limits on its rights to develop militarily.

Germany After the War

Many historians, in hindsight, believe that the Allies were excessive in their punishment of Germany and that the harsh Treaty of Versailles actually planted the seeds of World War II, rather than foster peace. The treaty’s declaration that Germany was entirely to blame for the war was a blatant untruth that humiliated the German people. Furthermore, the treaty imposed steep war reparations payments on Germany, meant to force the country to bear the financial burden of the war. Although Germany ended up paying only a small percentage of the reparations it was supposed to make, it was already stretched financially thin by the war, and the additional economic burden caused enormous resentment. Ultimately, extremist groups, such as the Nazi Party, were able to exploit this humiliation and resentment and take political control of the country in the decades following.

c) Study Map and/or draw in notebook:



d) Define each of the following words and use each in a sentence. List the part of speech.

avert
exultation
abyss
salient
idle
mutiny
consent
abridge
financier
paradox
ingenuity
supplant
stringent
confer
plunder
deliberate
proclaim
emancipate
sedition

e)Watch the following film clips and take notes:


video

video





f) Read pages 359-369 in Zinn and take notes. Your notes will be graded on a four point scale.

4 - clearly shows connections between at least 3 causes of WWI: nationalism, militarism, secret alliances, imperialism
- discusses relevant people and events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections between 2 or 3 causes of WWI: nationalism, militarism, secret alliances, imperialism
- discusses relevant people and events
- demonstrates understanding of most of the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence


2 - makes some connections between 1 or 2 causes of WWI: nationalism, militarism, secret alliances, imperialism
- lists relevant people and events
- demonstrates little to no understanding of most of the text's central ideas
- provides little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence




1 - smh

Politics and Government Homework - Due Monday, Oct 24

Unit 1 - Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?


1) Vocabulary - Define each of the following terms. Include the part of speech. Use each in a sentence.

reluctant
progenitor
stern
premise
miniscule
derive
proviso
prescient
somber
maxim
arbiter
odious
despot
deliberation
anomaly
folklore
conciliation
indolent
constituent
hypergamous
smolder
lucrative
sallow
caricature
regal
mediocrity
nubile
nettle
ad hoc
desultory
shinnied

2) Read Vidal, chapter 2.

Take notes in notebook, or type and tape in notebook. Notes will be checked and graded on a 4 pt scale. Be prepared to discuss with a partner tomorrow.


4 - clearly shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses Adams, Jefferson, Franklin, King George III, Paine
- discusses key/important events
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses Adams, Jefferson, Franklin, King George III, Paine
- discusses key/important events
- demonstrates understanding of most of the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



2 - shows connections
- discusses several but not all of the following: Adams, Jefferson, Franklin, King George III, Paine
- demonstrates understanding two or less of the text's central ideas
- little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; little or no numeric data; little mention of major events or people
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence


1 - smh

3) Watch the following video clips and take notes. Use the rubric above for your notes.



video

video

video

video

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Politics and Government Homework - Due Oct 19

Unit 1 - Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?

Read Inventing a Nation pg 13-25

Take notes in notebook, or type and tape in notebook. Notes will be checked and graded on a 4 pt scale. Be prepared to discuss with a partner tomorrow.


4 - clearly shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses Madison, Jefferson, Hamilton, Washington, Smith and Clinton
- clearly demonstrates understanding of all the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



3 - shows connections to Essential Question: Did the Constitution's framers intend to create a revolutionary and democratic government?
- discusses Madison, Jefferson, Hamilton, Washington, Smith and Clinton
- demonstrates understanding of most of the text's central ideas
- provides evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; evidence includes numeric data, relevant people and events
- notes are neat and organized; contain headings that show general ideas; contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence



2 - shows connections
- discusses several but not all of the following: Madison, Jefferson, Hamilton, Washington, Smith and Clinton
- demonstrates understanding two or less of the texts's central ideas
- little evidence/quotes to support your claims/arguments; little or no numeric data; little mention of major events or people
- notes are sloppy and unorganized; no headings to distinguish general ideas; doesn't contain bullets, numbers, letters or other symbols to distinguish supporting ideas and evidence


1 - smh

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