Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century America - Break Assignment

During the break you will read about the 1920s and the Great Depression as discussed by Howard Zinn. You will read the end of "War is the Health of the State (pgs 368-376)" and the entire chapter "Self Help in Hard Times (pgs 377-406)."

In our next two units we will investigate the Labor Movement and the Civil Rights Movement. As you read I would like you to consider the questions: Why then? Why did the Labor Movement get underway when it did?

Assignment: After reading, I would like you to identify the following terms. You should draw a three column chart. Label as follows.

Column A - Point of View (What does Zinn want you to know, think and believe about this?)

Column B - Evidence (Quote the text)

Column C - Connections/Significance/Discussion (Why is this term important? How does this connect to the Labor Movement? How does this help you answer or begin to answer the EQ "why then"?)


War is the Health of the State (369-376, start at "About nine hundred people went to jail under the Espionage Act...)"


Espionage Act
American Protective League
Green Corn Rebellion
Jeanette Rankin
Kate Richards O'Hare
IWW Trials
Palmer Raids
Sacco and Vanzetti


Self Help for Hard Times

Seattle General Strike
Establishment's Reaction to the Seattle Strike
Excerpt from The Nation
Immigration and Labor/Strikes/Strike Breaking
U. S. Policy Toward Immigrants during the 1920s
Marcus Garvey
Distribution of Wealth During the 1920s
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Sinclair Lewis
Fiorello La Guardia
stretch-out
National Textile Workers Union
Stock Market Crash 1929
Grapes of Wrath
WWI Bonus Army
NRA
TVA
AAA
Role of the Communist Party During the Depression
Wagner-Connery Bill/Wagner Act
Organized Labor in the South
Hosea Hudson
sit down strikes
John Lewis/CIO
Economic changes brought by the New Deal
New Deal and African Americans

Monday, December 21, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century Debate Guidelines

Please use these guidelines to write your speeches. Your speeches must:

-state the resolution

-contain definitions of the key terms

-clearly state the team's point of view

-discuss at least one value and argument

-contain 3 types evidence that supports your argument (primary, secondary, numeric/statistical)

-contain evidence from reputable sources

-be persuasive

-demonstrate an that you have an understanding of the historical context of your topic

-make connections between the debate and the Democracy and Equality for women unit
-must conform to grammar standards


Your speech presenation must:

-demonstrate that you understand the content of your speech

-demonstrate that the speech has been practiced

-make eye contact with audience

-must directly clash with the values and arguments of opponents

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century Debate Pairings

Tuesday, December 22

Resolution A)


Affirmative: Kaitie, Rigel, Raven
Negative: Luz, Shirley, Javon

Affirmative: Ali, Christina C., Jon
Negative: Jason, Daury, Lina

Tuesday, Jan 5

Resolution B)

Affirmative: Ariel, Megumi, Marshall
Negative: Nikki, Naima, Nia

Affirmative:
Melanie, Cecil, Haley
Negative: Corey, Olivia, Eric


Wednesday, January 6

Resolution A)


Affirmative: Elon, David, Massiel (Graciela)
Negative: Gilbert, Paris, Leticia (Evelyn)

Affirmative: Chris Mc, Tamiko, Arisa
Negative: Julie, Mara, Alwyn

Affirmative: Yasmine, Yukki, Sage
Negative: Jason, Daury, Lina


Friday, Jan 8

Resolution A)

Affirmative: Itzel, Christina, Lauren (Christina S.)
Negative: Luz, Shirley, Javon

Debate Flow/Order of Speakers

1- First Affirmative Constructive (4 min)

2- Negative Cross Ex/First Affirmative Constructive (2 min)

3- First Negative Constructive (4 min)

4- Affirmative Cross Ex/First Negative Constructive (2 min)

5- Second Affirmative Constructive (4 min)

6- Negative Cross Ex/Second Affirmative Constructive (2 min)

7- Second Negative Constructive (4 min)

8- Affirmative Cross Ex/Second Negative Constructive

9- Closing Speech by Negative Cross Ex

10- Closing Speech by Affirmative Cross Ex

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century - Quiz Monday, December 14th

-Quiz Monday on Women's Suffrage and Birth Control Movements

-Quiz will cover class notes, Zinn (Socialist Challenge, War is Health of State), Battle for Suffrage, Birth Control Packet

-Multiple choice, matching, short answer

Civil War and Reconstruction Quiz Monday, December 14

-Quiz Monday on the Northern and Southern economies

-Quiz will cover class notes, Zinn (Other Civil War) and Slavery and the Growth of the South

-Multiple choice, matching, short answer

Democratizing 20th Century - Some Possible Values

Resolution A: That unrestricted abortion access is an essential component of women's reproductive rights.

Aff: reproductive freedom, personal liberty/sexual freedom, right to privacy, promotion of public health and wellbeing

Neg: sanctity of the unborn, chastity/sexual restraint, promotion of public health and wellbeing


Resolution B: That comprehensive sex education should be compulsory in public schools.


Aff: public health/wellbeing, freedom of inquiry

Neg: parental liberty, chastity/sexual restraint, free exercise of religion

Democratizing 20th Century - Some Possible Resources for Debate

Relevant Cases

http://www.tourolaw.edu/Patch/Roe/

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0410_0113_ZS.html

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1901-1939/1922/1922_325/

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0381_0479_ZO.html

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/rights/landmark_casey.html

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/forum/january98/roe_1-30.html


Organizations

http://www.quaqua.org/

http://www.quaqua.org/standardreview.htm

http://reproductiverights.org/

http://www.prochoiceamerica.org/

http://www.operationrescue.org/

http://www.focusonthefamily.com/

www.prochoiceamerica.org/issues/sex-education/

http://www.now.org/

Online Publications and Magazines

http://www.newsweek.com/id/56801

http://www.freep.com/article/20091204/NEWS15/91204032/1320/Ad-targets-Stupak-amendment-on-abortion

http://www.bangordailynews.com/detail/131957.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1622610

http://www.nationalreview.com/

http://spectator.org/

http://www.weeklystandard.com/

http://www.thenation.com/

http://www.newyorker.com/

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.dailykos.com/

Miscellaneous Articles


http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-07-16-abortion-protest_x.htm

http://reproductiverights.org/en/press-room/court-strikes-down-mississippi-abortion-law-women-in-state-narrowly-escape-virtual-ban-on

http://health.usnews.com/blogs/on-parenting/2009/12/07/boys-miss-out-on-sex-education-talks-with-parents.html

http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=225332

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/12/08/teenagers-get-sex-education-internet-not-parents.html

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerletters/2009/12/filling_us_senate_vacancies_de.html

Democratizing 20th Century Debate Resolutions

A) That unrestricted access to abortion is an essential component of women's reproductive rights.

B) That comprehensive sex education should be compulsory in public schools.

civil war/immigration charts

charts should include the following:
each should be supported with a quote
*** need three quotes

a) immigrant group
b) push/pull factors
c) destination
d) economics: work experiences/jobs/working conditions***
e) cultural: social/religious/political experiences in U. S.***

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century/Civil War Vocabulary Due Friday, Nov 20

Define each word, list the part of speech and use in a sentence.

grievance
writ
guerilla
feudal
sporadic
thwart
fiasco
martial law
naturalized citizen
tumultuous
consensus
utopian/utopia
appendage
abet
incendiary
degradation
vehement
ardent
resolute
impudence
levity
commodity
wean
rhetoric
dissent
insubordinate
denounce
emancipate
affirm
rationalize
inundate
implication

Sunday, November 1, 2009

Homework Due Wednesday, Nov 4

Democratizing 20th Century, Civil War and Reconstruction
Homework, Due Nov 4

a) Look at the requirement for your next essay, particularly the guiding questions.

b) Start thinking about a thesis for your essay; write down (this will be a working thesis and it will be refined later)

c) List possible arguments that can be used as your thesis. The thesis should have 2-3 arguments.

d) For each argument, write three medium length quotes from the texts that can be used as evidence.

e) For each quote, explain the connection between your quote and argument. (Be prepared to share with a partner and the class)


***I will not be in tomorrow. Civil War should continue watching Queen. Democratizing should fill out secondary source sheets (they are on my desk) for Who Built America? pg 216-229 I will check on Wednesday.

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Civil War and Reconstruction Response Essay-How Can Economic Conflict Lead to War

Unit 1 EQ: How Can Economic Conflict Lead to War?

Essay, Due Monday, November 23
**Please keep in mind that we will spend some class time working on this project, but we will move on to our next unit before the final paper is due. Use your time wisely.

For the past several weeks we have been watching "Queen" and reading documents that expore the issues of race, gender and class in the antebellum South. In your next assignment you will weave these pieces together to provide your own analysis and interpretation of the pre-Civil War South. You will have a choice between two response questions:

a) How did slavery the lives impact black women, particulary in their roles as mothers? How did slavery impact African American families? Do you think the legacy of slavery is still evident today in this context?



b) How did the economic system of the South impact whites? How did the institution of slavery impact social class and economic opportunities among Southern whites? How did class distinctions impact whites' perceptions of each other?


Your paper must contain eveidence obtained from the following sources:

a) "Slavery and the Growth of the South"
b) "The Nature of Female Slavery"
c) "The Peculiar Institution"**
d) "The Old South"**
e) "Drawing the Color Line", "Slavery Without Submission, Emancipation Without Freedom"**

**These are class refernce texts. You must use class time to read and annotate these texts. They cannot be brought home)

You should submit an essay that:

a) Contains a clear point of view and explicitly uses evidence to defend your thesis.

b) Demonstrates your your understanding of the antebellum culture and economic system.

c) Includes at least 8 quotes from the documents you received in class, including primary sources and statistic/numeric evidence.

d) References one of the characters from "Queen" as part of your discussion about slavery or social class; includes quotes from the film

e) Is nuanced. Evidence should be mixed and not all come from the same document. You should have more than one argument.

f) Demonstrates critical thinking; raises and answers questions.

g) Conforms to grammar standards.

i) Is interesting to read and well written.

h) Is 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced 12 pt font

Democratizing Twentieth Century Response Essay-Women's Suffrage

Response essay, due Friday, November 13.

For the past several weeks we have been studying the Industrial Revolution as a context for understanding how and why women got the right to vote when they did. In your next essay, you will discuss the Women's Suffrage Movement. You will demonstrate your understanding of this movement--its roots, its successes and its limitations. You will also demostrate your understanding of the historic context, including the rise of socialism and Progressivism.

In this essay you must include evidence obtained from the following sources:

a) Howard Zinn - "The Socialist Challenge" and "War is the Health of the State"
b) Kerber, De Hart - "Industrializing America"
c) Who Built America? - "Woman Suffrage", "Factory Reform and the Conditions of Labor", "The Garment Industry and Working Women's Activism", "Socialist, Marxists and Anarchists" **(this book is only available in class and yuo must use class time to take your notes)
d) Women's Suffrage Packet

Your essay should respond to the Essential Questions:

a) Why then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

b) What gains were won? What gains were sought but not won?

c) If this reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?

You must write an essay that:

a) Contains a clear point of view and explicitly uses evidence to defend your thesis.

b) Demonstrates your knowledge of the Women's Suffrage Movement and its historic context.

c) Demonstrates your understanding of political and economic systems.

d) Includes at least 8 quotes from the documents you received in class, including primary sources and statistic/numeric evidence.

e) Includes at least 2 quotes from an article you found that discusses Women's Suffrage

f) Is nuanced. Evidence should be mixed and not all come from the same document. You should have more than one argument.

g) Demonstrates critical thinking; raises and answers questions.

h) Conforms to grammar standards.

i) Is interesting to read and well written.

j) Is 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced 12 pt font

Sunday, October 25, 2009

Homework Due Monday, October 26

Sorry this post is late folks (no computer). Please try to have this done for Monday, but I wont check until Tuesday.

Civil War and Reconstruction

Read: Slavery and the Growth of the South pgs 306 to 324

-fill out first analysis sheet for pg 306-16 (Agranian Society through Slaves and Conditions of Their Servitude)

-fill out second sheet for pg 316-324 (Slaves and Condotions of Their Servitude to Harmony and Tension in a Slave Society)


Democratizing Twentieth Century America

-Read the Battle for Suffrage Packet. Identify the following terms using a few sentences for each:


Seneca Falls Convention
women's education/college
Grover Cleveland
Anna Garlin Spencer
Carrie Chapmann Catt
Alice Paul
Woodrow Wilson/Women's Suffrage
Woodrow Wilson/WWI
CPI
Fourteen Points
Nineteenth Amendment


-construct a venn diagram to compare NASWA and NWP (National Woman's Party)

-Read Zinn pgs 56-the end, make notes and annotate.

Answer the following questions:

1. Discuss the Progressive Era. List the pieces of Progressive legislation. What does Zinn seem to be saying about the intentions of Progressives like Theodore Roosevelt. Compare Progressivism with socialism.

2. Discuss the Ludow Massacre.

3. What was the National Civil Federation. How did it undermine the goals of socialists and radicals?

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Civil War and Reconstruction Homework, Due Oct 22

Finish Reading the Nature of Female Slavery (pgs 110-115)

1. Discuss truancy among female slaves. Why were female slaves less likely to have survival skills than male slaves?

2. What was an abroad marriage? How did the abroad marriage impact the male or female slave's ability to escape? Discuss.

3. Discuss the slave women Alcey and Lucy. What tactics did they use to resist involuntary servitude?

4. Discuss the story of Dr. Keitt as told by Mary Chesnut. What do you think of his slave's actions?

5. Discuss the use of illness to resist involuntary servitude. Why was this strategy more frequently employed by women?

6. Discuss President James Polk's slave Maria.

7. Discuss health care on plantations.

8. Discuss abortion and infanticide on the plantation. What is your personal view about what you've read about these issues?

Democratizing 20th Century America, Homework Due Oct. 22

Read Zinn pages 44-56

1) Create a three column chart. Label the columns as follows:

Column A - Term/Concept/Person
(For this column discuss the item. What does Zinn want you to know, thing and believe about this item.)

Column B - Quote
(Select a quote or quotes from the text about this item.)

Column C - Connections
(How does this connect to industrialization, women's suffrage, immigration or another unit topic)

Terms:

**means two quotes are needed

anarcho-syndicalism
IWW (I know you did this term before, you must do it again)
free speech fights
The Preacher and the Slave
Joe Hill
Lawrence, MA (I expect a detailed discussion of these events)**
difference between the AFL and IWW
"One Big Union"
Rules for Female Teachers


2)How did immigration impact the labor movement during the early Twentieth Century? (Include at least two quotes in your answer)

Saturday, October 10, 2009

Homework: Week of 10/13, Schedule for Week of 10/13

We will have a very limited schedule next week, but you will all need to have these assignments done by Thursday. Our discussions and activities will be anchored by the readings, so make sure you have read everything by Tuesday. I suggest that you read and annotate first, then answer questions. Sorry this post is a little late.

Democratizing 20th Century
Unit 1: Democracy and Equality for Women: The Right to Vote - Why Then?

a) Read the following links:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/peopleevents/pande04.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/chicago/sfeature/sf_haymarket.html

b) Read Zinn pg 31-44

c) create a 3 column chart and label:

Column A - Identifications: Term described and discussed. What does Howard Zinn want you to know, think and believe about this term or concept?

Column B - Evidence: Write the quote that you used to draw your conclusions for Column A

Column C - Connections: In which ways does this term connect to at leat one of the following? women's suffrage, industrialization, imperialism or immigration

Terms:

Mark Twain
Upton Sinclair
Muckraker
J. P. Morgan, J. D. Rockefeller
Taylorism
Immigration and the Labor Force
Triangle Shirtwaist Company
International Ladies Garment Workers
Unionization/AFL
Samuel Gompers
Big Bill Heywood
IWW

d) create a primary source analysis table for
1. the quote by Emma Goldman on page 31
2. the quote from Cosmopolitan Magazine on page 35

Civil War and Reconstruction Unit 1: Race, Gender and Class in the Slave South - How can Economic Conflict Lead to War?

Read Nature of Female Slavery pgs 108-110

1. What percentage of the black population was enslaved by 1850?

2. How did geography impact fertitility? Use statistical data to support your answer.

3. Discuss the slave fertility rate.

4. Describe the experience of escaped slave Josiah Hanson.

5. Identify: Harriet Beecher Stowe

6. Discuss the experiences of the slaves Gina, Mary Montgomery and Linda Bret. **Include one quote for each.

7. Discuss the role gender played on patterns of resistance to slavery. **2 paragraphs, 4 quotes

Read Slavery and the Growth of the South pages 301-306 (until agrarian society)

1. Identify: Frederick Douglass

2. Discuss differences between North and South. Create a T-Chart.

3. Define: yeoman

4. Discuss the regional differences regarding slavery.

5. Identify: cotton boom, How did British demand for cotton impact the South?

6. Identify: Jefferson Davis

7. What was meant by "one generation aristocrats?" Explain your answer. How did cotton change social class dynamics between 1800 and 1860? Can you think of any "first generation aristocrats" who exist today?


8. What conclusions can you draw from the map on 305? Explain.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Due Wed, Oct 7 Civil War/Reconstruction

Read "Nature of Female Slavery" pg 104-to top of 109

complete front and back of secondary source analysis table

Due Wed, Oct 7 Democrating 20th Century Homework

Read "Industrializing America"

Complete front and back of secondary source analysis table

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Due Friday Oct 9 - Vocabulary

For each word

a) list the part of speech
b) write the definition
c) construct a sentence or two that conveys your understanding of the word's meaning

agitator
amenity
aristocrat
autonomous
benevolent
chivalrous
commerce
cursory
domestic
emigrate
entrepreneur
exploit/exploitative
fluctuate
foundry
genteel
immense
inclement
industrious
laconic
lament
lure
multifaceted
orator
paternalistic
plague/plagued
prominent
rural
reluctant
subsistence
suffrage
teem/teeming
torment
unprecedented
urban
voracious
virtual

Terms for Exam - Tuesday, Oct 6

Be fimiliar the class documents (Tancredo interview, Denis Kucinich handout, Libertarian Party Platform handout)

Be familiar with the following terms or concepts:

political left, right and center, communism, socialism, liberalism, libertarianism, conservatism, religious fundamentalism, fascism, capitalism, free market, social democracy, nationalism, Social Darwinism, subsidize, Democrat, Republican

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Denis Kucinich Homework 9-22-09

After reading the Kucinich policy brief and press release, construct a primary source analysis table for each.

POV: (What is the main idea? What does the author want you to know, think, believe? Who is the intended audience? How can you tell?)

Evidence: (What did you read specifically that lead you to this conclusion? Quote key passages from the text directly. List and define key words.)

Connections: (Discuss some events that took place during the time period and discuss how they may have impacted the author's point of view.)

Reflection: (What is your personal opinion about this document and its author?)

Monday, September 21, 2009

Tom Tancredo Interview Homework (9-21-09)

After reading the Tom Tancredo interview create a three column chart. Label as follows:

Column A: Quote

Column B: Know/Think/Believe (What does Tancredo want you to know, think and believe?)

Column C: Left or Right? Why? (List the political ideology and corresponding bullets from the ideological spectrum chart)

***You must include six quotes from the document.
***Your answers must demonstrate critical thinking.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Due Tuesday, Sept 29: Personal Political Framework Essay

Personal Political Framework Reflection

We have spent the first few weeks talking about different political ideologies. I want you to start thinking about where you stand on the political-economic ideological spectrum. How would you vote if you could? Why? What would your political party look like if you started one on your own?

Respond to the following:

Do you lean left, right or center? Why? What do you believe about rights, economics and society?

Discuss a political ideology that you favor.


For this assignment you must write an essay that:

a) Contains a clear point of view and explicitly uses evidence to defend your ideological stance.
b) Demonstrates your knowledge of the political-economic ideological spectrum and basic understanding of the terms “left” and “right.”
c) Demonstrates your understanding of political and economic systems.
d) Includes at least 5 quotes from the documents you received in class, including at least 1 significant quote from a party platform.
e) Includes at least 2 quotes from an article you found that discusses your point of view
f) Is nuanced. Evidence should be mixed and not all come from the same document. You should have more than one argument.
g) Demonstrates critical thinking; raises and answers questions.
h) Conforms to grammar standards.
i) Is interesting to read and well written.
j) Is 3 pages, typed, double-spaced 12 pt font

Civil War and Reconstruction Course Outline 2009-2010

It is my hope that in this course you will gain a better understanding of the causes and effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction through the use of investigative research. Scholarly works, primary source documents, documentaries, docudramas and classic films will be used to examine both the historical time period and the folklore that sprung up about it subsequently. After a detailed investigation of the role slavery, cotton and industrialization played in the Northern and Southern economies, you will consider the moral arguments used for and against the “Peculiar Institution.”
The War itself will be seen through the eyes of soldiers, slaves and women. President Lincoln will be contrasted with other historical figures who took a more radical stance against slavery.
The struggle to establish and maintain racial equality in the post-war South will be contrasted with the challenges of upholding the principle of equality and liberty today and we will ask, have we yet created a post-racial society?



Essential Question: At What Point are Differences of Opinion Irreconcilable?



September - Introduction to Mr. Copeland’s History Class


• Political Systems
• Economic Systems
• Political and Economic Ideological Spectrum
• World and U. S. Geography

Skills: Note taking, analysis of primary sources
Texts: Party platforms of selected political parties, quotations from selected historical figures
Films: Excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs
Assessments: Quizzes, 3 page personal political/economic framework essay with quotes



October – Race, Gender and Class in the Antebellum South
Essential Question: How Can Economic Conflict Lead to War?


• The Atlantic Slave Trade
• Slavery in the Americas
• The Conditions and Toll of Involuntary Servitude in the United States
• “King Cotton”: Class Among White Southerners

Skills: analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence
Texts: A People’s History of the United States (Zinn), From Slavery To Freedom (Franklin), Civil War and Reconstruction (Randall), Who Built America? (American Social History Project) A People a Nation (Norton, et al)
Films: Queen (Mini-series based on book by Alex Haley)
Assessments: Quizzes, Unit Exam, Film Reflection/Response Essay with thesis and quotes




November – Economic Roots of the War
Essential Question: How Can Economic Conflict Lead to War?

• Industrial Capitalism
• Urbanization and Immigration in the North
• Economic Relationship between the North and South

Skills: U. S. geography/map, analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence
Texts: A People’s History of the United States (Zinn), From Slavery To Freedom (Franklin), Civil War and Reconstruction (Randall), Who Built America? (American Social History Project) A People a Nation (Norton, et al)
Films: Selected CUNY, PBS and other documentaries, Gone with the Wind
Assessments: quizzes, unit exam, 4 page response essay with clear thesis and evidence





December /January – Political Roots of the War
Essential Question: How Much Damage and Destruction are You Willing to Cause to do What You Believe is Right? The Trial of John Brown


• Sectionalism
• Abolitionism
• Mexican War
• Trial of John Brown

Skills: analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, logic, reasoning and debating skills
Texts: A People’s History of the United States (Zinn), From Slavery To Freedom (Franklin), Civil War and Reconstruction (Randall), Who Built America? (American Social History Project) A People a Nation (Norton, et al) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Films: Selected CUNY, PBS and other documentaries
Assessments: quizzes, unit exam, mock trial group project





February /March – The Civil War
Essential Question: Did Lincoln Fight the War to Free the Slaves?

• Abraham Lincoln
• Battlefield Medicine
• Military Technology
• Role of African American Soldiers
• Role of Women in the War
• Economic Impact of the War

Skills: map/ U. S. geography, analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence
Texts: A People’s History of the United States (Zinn), From Slavery To Freedom (Franklin), Civil War and Reconstruction (Randall), Who Built America? (American Social History Project) A People a Nation (Norton, et al) Our Lincoln (Foner), Women’s America (Kerber)
Films: Glory, The Red Badge of Courage
Assessments: unit exam, quizzes, 6 page response essay with clear thesis and arguments, group presentation




April/May/June – Reconstruction
Essential Question: What was it like to go from Slavery to Freedom to Jim Crow?

• Presidential Reconstruction
• Radical Reconstruction
• Southern Redemption and the Restoration of White Supremacy
• Industrialization

Skills: analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of graphs and numeric data, content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence
Texts: A People’s History of the United States (Zinn), From Slavery To Freedom (Franklin), Civil War and Reconstruction (Randall), Who Built America? (American Social History Project) A People a Nation (Norton, et al) Our Lincoln (Foner), Women’s America (Kerber)
Films: Birth of a Nation, Aftershock: Beyond the Civil War, American Experience: The Richest Man in the World - Andrew Carnegie (1997)
Assessments: unit exam, final exam, quizzes, 4 page response essay with clear thesis and arguments

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Course Syllabus 2009-2010

In this course you will examine the roots of various Twentieth Century political, social, economic and cultural reform movements. For each movement, you will answer a series of essential questions. Through these questions you will gain both a sense of historical context and an understanding of the tactics used by those who sought to bring about greater democracy and equality in the United States.

Essential Questions: Why Then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did? What gains were won? What gains were sought but not won? If the reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?



SEPTEMBER - Introduction to Mr. Copeland’s History Class

• Political Systems
• Economic Systems
• Political and Economic Ideological Spectrum
• World and U. S. Geography

Skills: Note taking, analysis of primary sources
Texts: Party Platforms of selected political parties, quotations from selected historic figures
Films: Excerpts from political roundtable discussions on various cable and PBS programs
Assessments: Quizzes, personal political/economic framework essay



OCTOBER - Democracy and Equality for Women

• The Right to Vote
• The Movement for Birth Control
• Industrialization
• World War I

Skills: content vocabulary usage, analysis of primary and secondary sources, argument development for a debate, logic and reasoning
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Women’s America (Kerber, DeHart), Legislating Women’s Morals (Sanger), Comstock Law, Selected Handouts
Films: Iron Jawed Angels, Choices of the Heart
Assessments: Quizzes, Response Essay, Unit Exam, Reproductive Rights Debate



NOVEMBER – Labor Democratizes America

• The Progressive Era
• The Great Depression
• The New Deal
• The Red Scare

Skills: content vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Who Built America, Roosevelt and the New Deal, Selected Handouts
Films: Native Son, Grapes of Wrath, The Front, Roger and Me, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: Quizzes, Response Essay, Unit Exam



DECEMBER /JANUARY - Democracy and Equality for African Americans

• World War II
• The Cold War
• The Civil Rights Movement

Skills: vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, organization in writing a formal, academic essay, presentation/power point, public speaking
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), From Slavery to Freedom (Franklin), Movements of the New Left (Goss)
Films: Eyes on the Prize, Battle for America’s Schools, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: Quizzes, final exam, independent/group research project



FEBRUARY/MARCH – Democracy and Equality for Youth

• The Cold War
• Student Movement
• Anti-War Movement/Vietnam War
• Hippie Movement

Skills: vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, discerning author bias
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), The Children (Halberstam), Movements of the New Left (Goss)
Films: Two Days in October, Summer of Love, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: Quizzes, Unit Exam, Response Essay





MARCH/APRIL – Pluralistic America

• The Cold War
• Black Power Movement
• Latino Cultural Liberation
• Women’s Liberation
• American Indian Cultural Liberation
• Gay and Lesbian Liberation

Skills: vocabulary usage, SAT prep vocabulary usage in writing, analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, discerning author bias
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), The Children (Halberstam), Movements of the New Left (Goss), Stonewall (Duberman), Columbus to Castro (Williams)
Films: The Education of Sonny Carson, Malcolm X, Milk, Yo Soy Boriqua, Selected CUNY Documentaries
Assessments: quizzes, unit exam, group project and independent research paper



MAY/JUNE – Ronald Reagan and the Rise of the New Right

• Conservative Movement/1964/Barry Goldwater
• The Presidency of Ronal Reagan and Political Realignment of the South
• The Collapse of the Soviet Union

Skills: Analysis of primary and secondary sources, development of a written argument, determining appropriateness of evidence, discerning author bias
Texts: The Twentieth Century (Zinn), the Rise of Southern Republicans (Black), Unfinished Journey (Chaffe), The Conscience of a Liberal (Krugman)
Assessments: Quizzes, Final Exam, Group Presentation/Independent Research Project

Friday, June 5, 2009

Bill of Rights 1789 - present Final Exam Terms

Establishment Clause
Free Exercise Clause
Thomas Jefferson
WVA Board of Education v. Barnette
Minersville v. Gobitis
Felix Franfurter
Jehovah’s Witnesses
Hugo Black
New York State Board of Regents
Engle v. Vitale
Abington v. Schempp
Epperson v. Arkansas
Clarence Darrow
Butler Act
ACLU
William Jennings Bryan
balanced time
release time
Van Orden v. Perry
McCreary County, Kentucky v. ACLU Kentucky
Everson v. Board of Education
Zorach v. Clauson
Wisconsin v. Yoder
Welsh v. United States
Mueller v. Allen
McCollum v. Board of Education
Pierce v. Society of Sisters
Wallace v. Jaffree
Walz v. NYC Tax Commission
“benevolent neutrality”
“child benefit theory”
Excessive Entanglement Standard
Oregon v. Smith
Lemon v. Kurtzman
Compelling interest rule
Generally applicable law rule
McGowan v. Maryland (blue laws)
Zelman v. Simmons-Harris

United States Constitution
• Basic structure of
• First 10 amendments of
• Basic powers held by different branches of government

Trial jury
Grand jury
14th amendment
Bill of Rights
due process
equal protection
civil liberties
judicial review
Dangerous Tendencies Test/Clear and Present Danger
Writ of certiorari


Barron v. Mayor of Baltimore
Hurtado v. California
Slaughterhouse Cases
Kelo v. New London
Earls v. Bd of Ed
Meyer v. Nebraska
Gitlow v. New York
Marbury v. Madison
Dred Scott v. Sandford
Schenk v. United States
Presser v. Illinois
Abrams v. United States

Bolshevic Revolution
Haymarket Uprising
IWW
Industrialization
Espionage Act
Revolutionary socialism
Earl Warren
“power of the purse”
Federalism
Federalist/anti-federalist
Electoral College
Constitutional Convention of 1787
separation of powers
John Locke
Declaration of Independence
checks and balances
amending process
House of Representatives
Senate
Articles of Confederation
Bill of Rights
Whiskey Rebellion
Shays’ Rebellion
New Jersey Plan
Virginia Plan
Connecticut Compromise
George Washington
James Madison
Alexander Hamilton
Thomas Jefferson
Executive, legislative, judicial branches (major powers of each)
Framers of the Constitution
States rights/state sovereignty
Earl Warren/Major Justices

United States v. Santana
Terry v. Ohio
FISA court
PATRIOT ACT
Mapp v. Ohio
Weeks v. United States
Probable cause warrant
Roe v. Wade
Griswold v. United States
Writ of assistance
“hot pursuit”
Exclusionary rule
Planned Parenthood v. Casey
Lawrence v. Texas
Bowers v. Hardwick
Atkins v. Virginia
Furman v. Georgia
Gregg v. Georgia
Miranda v. Arizona
Powell v. Alabama
Gideon v. Wainwright
Stanford v. Kentucky
Bakke v. California
warrant
Earls v. Board of Ed
probable cause
inevitable discovery discovery

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century America

Read Zinn

Identify each term with a quote

Honeywell Corp
Survey Research Center of History poll
Angela Davis, Black Panthers
Watergate
Security and Exchange Commission
Corporate Influence in politics
ARAMCO
Robert McNamara
Vietnam War

Bill of Right Case Links

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1960/1960_236/

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_496/

http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2002/2002_02_102/

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_18/

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1901-1939/1932/1932_98/

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1965/1965_759/

for each of the links above, list the facts of the case, constitutional question, holding and rationale, and your opinion.

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Announcement About Exam Date

Hey folks. I posted this stuff kind of late. We will finish the films we started on Monday and Tuesday and we will take the test on Wednesday so people have more time to prepare.

The test is multiple choice, matching and a few short answers.

Please make sure you review the following readings

Bill of Rights:

Freedom of Expression: Religion (handout)
Supremes' Greatest Hits (Chap 2)
The First Amendment: Freedom of--and from--Religion (handout)
Notes From Jesus Camp
Oregon v. Smith (handout)

Democratizing 20th Century

(readings are listed on your revie sheet)

Bill of Rights Review Sheet

Establishment Clause
Free Exercise Clause
Thomas Jefferson
WVA Board of Education v. Barnette
Minersville v. Gobitis
Felix Franfurter
Jehovah’s Witnesses
Hugo Black
New York State Board of Regents
Engle v. Vitale
Abington v. Schempp
Epperson v. Arkansas
Clarence Darrow
Butler Act
ACLU
William Jennings Bryan
balanced time
release time
Van Orden v. Perry
McCreary County, Kentucky v. ACLU Kentucky
Everson v. Board of Education
Zorach v. Clauson
Wisconsin v. Yoder
Welsh v. United States
Mueller v. Allen
McCollum v. Board of Education
Pierce v. Society of Sisters
Wallace v. Jaffree
Walz v. NYC Tax Commission
“benevolent neutrality”
“child benefit theory”
Excessive Entanglement Standard
Oregon v. Smith
Lemon v. Kurtzman
Compelling interest rule
Generally applicable law rule
McGowan v. Maryland (blue laws)
Zelman v. Simmons-Harris

Democratizing 20th Century Review Sheet

Contemporary Puerto Rico:

New Deal/Depression
Monroe Doctrine
Pedro Albizo Campos
Puerto Rican Young Lords
Nationalist Party
U. S. Intervention in Latin America
Foraker Act
Jones Act
centrales
Puerto Rican economy
Puerto Rican economic relationship w/U. S.
tariff
labor unions/labor movement
Progressive Era
Puerto Rican Statehood
Operation Bootstrap
Luis Munoz/PPD
Puerto Rican Constitution
Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act
Puerto Rico post establishment of commonwealth status

Zinn and Goss:

Women's Liberation
Red Power
Alcatraz Island
New Right
Roe v. Wade
Betty Friedan
ERA
Poor Black Woman
UFW
Our Bodies, Ourselves
NYRW
Election of 1968
Civil Rights Act 1964/Title VII, Voting Rights Act 1965, Civil Rights Act 1968
“Consciousness Raising”
Prison uprisings 1970s
Weathermen

Newsweek, Who We are Now

Lyndon Johnson
Nationality Act
majority-minority
Richard Nixon’s silent majority
Jamestown, Virginia 1619
Waves of U. S. immigration
impact of Marshall Plan on immigration
Nativism
Henry Cabot Lodge
McCarran-Walter Act

Also review notes of class lectures.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century America Homework 3-24-09

I am not assigning questions. Please read the next 2 sections about the 1940-60s in the packet.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century HW 3-23-09

1) Where did the U.S. intervene militarily during the early 20th century?

2) Discuss political and economic restrictions the US placed on P.R.

3) Discuss the role the U.S. played in P.R's sugar economy

4) What were P.R.'s 3 main exports?

5) Discuss the role of sugar and tobacco in the P.R. economy.

6) Discuss the working conditions of needle workers.

7) Discuss the trade relationships between U.S. and P.R.

8) Discuss changes in PR migration to US between 1900-1960.

9) Identify: a)foraker act
b) centrales
c)colones

10)Bring in doggy treats.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Vouchers

http://www.education.com/magazine/article/School_Vouchers/

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Bill of Rights Suggested Cases

use oyez.com to locate

a) Minervillesville School District v. Gobitis
b) Church of Lukumi Babalu Avye v. Hialeah
c) Everson v. Board of Education
d) McCollum v. Board of Education
e) Wallace v. Jaffree
f) Board of Education v. Allen
g) Lemon v. Kurtzman
h) Zelman v. Simmons-Harris
i) McGowan v. Maryland
j) Marsh v. Chambers

Friday, March 13, 2009

Bill of Rights Homework 3-13-09

Answer the following questions based on t he reading.

1. What were the main features of the voucher plan?
2. How did the components of the voucher plan address the achievement gap?
3. What were the differences between the initial voucher plan and the plan it evolved into?
4. According to what we know about inequality, race and the achievement gap in schools, do you think the voucher plan will solve these problems? Why/Why not? Explain in detail.

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Bill of Rights Homework 3-11-09

Identify the Following

Butler Act
William Jennings Bryan
Clarence Darrow
Epperson v. Arkansas
balanced time
Edwards v. Aguillar

Friday, February 13, 2009

Bill of Rights 1789-present Break Assignment

Bill of Rights Break Assignment

Case analysis for any 4 cases in packet

Analyses must include:

-2/3 quotes from minority or majority opinion
-state courts holding
-state facts of case
-state your opinion about the holding; state logical and constitutional arguments that support your opinion
-1 to ½ pages typed double space for each analysis

Friday, February 6, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century Homework 2-6-09

Zinn (finish reading packet)

pg 240-254

1. 1970 Gallup Poll
2. University of Michigan Survey
3. Richard Steinke
4. Ray Kroll
5. Moratorium Day Demonstration
6. Wallace Terry
7. Vietnam Vets Against the War
8. Ron Kovic
9. Sam Choy
10. April 1975
11. War Powers Resolution


Read Goss pg 23-31

1.

Friday, January 23, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century America Midterm Review

Democratizing 20th Century America
Midterm exam review

Harry Truman
Dwight Eisenhower
Richard Nixon
JFK
LBJ
Barry Goldwater
George Wallace
Eugene McCarthy
Vietnam War (History of, key events, antiwar movement)
NATO
Warsaw Pact
Ideological Realignment
Two Days in October
Eyes on the Prize
Battle for America’s Schools
Ngo Diem
Mao Zedong
Chiang Kai Shek
Ho Chi Mihn
Pentagon Papers
Bay of Pigs Invasion’
Cuban Missile Crisis
Montgomery Bus Boycott
Plessy v. Ferguson
Brown v. Bd of Ed
Golf of Tonkin Resolution
Mattachine Society
Winston Churchill/Iron Curtain
Covert action
Japanese Internment
Limited Test Ban Treaty
D├ętente
Free Speech Movement
Black Power Movement
Civil disobedience
Red Scare
Joseph McCarthy
Civil Rights Act/title VII
Truman Doctrine
Marshall Plan
Peace Corps
Cold War
Fair Deal
New Deal
Great Society
Open door policy of equal access
Atlantic charter
Taft-hartley act
Nuremberg Trials
Yalta Conference
Francisco Franco
Bill Levitt
Strom Thurmond
Eleanor Roosevelt
NAACP
SNCC
John Lewis
Walter White
AFL-CIO
containment

Bill of Rights Mid-term Terms

United States Constitution
• Basic structure of
• First 10 amendments of
• Basic powers held by different branches of government

Trial jury
Grand jury
14th amendment
Bill of Rights
due process
equal protection
civil liberties
judicial review
Dangerous Tendencies Test/Clear and Present Danger
Writ of certiorari


Barron v. Mayor of Baltimore
Hurtado v. California
Slaughterhouse Cases
Kelo v. New London
Earls v. Bd of Ed
Meyer v. Nebraska
Gitlow v. New York
Marbury v. Madison
Dred Scott v. Sandford
Schenk v. United States
Presser v. Illinois
Abrams v. United States

Bolshevic Revolution
Haymarket Uprising
IWW
Industrialization
Espionage Act
Revolutionary socialism
Earl Warren
“power of the purse”
Federalism
Federalist/anti-federalist
Electoral College
Constitutional Convention of 1787
separation of powers
John Locke
Declaration of Independence
checks and balances
amending process
House of Representatives
Senate
Articles of Confederation
Bill of Rights
Whiskey Rebellion
Shays’ Rebellion
New Jersey Plan
Virginia Plan
Connecticut Compromise
George Washington
James Madison
Alexander Hamilton
Thomas Jefferson
Executive, legislative, judicial branches (major powers of each)
Framers of the Constitution
States rights/state sovereignty
Earl Warren/Major Justices

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century America 1-20-09

Read Gosse book pages 15-23
Identify the following terms and make a chart:

1. President Commission Status of Women
2. Title VII
3. Gay Rights/Europe
4. Mattachine Society
5. Franklin Kamey
6. Liberal Consensus
7. Teach-Ins
8. Eugene McCarthy
9. NLF
10. Black Power
11. Stokley Carmichael
12. NOW
13. NYRW
14. Czechoslovakia
15. Abbie Hoffman
16. George Wallace

HAPPY OBAMA DAY!

Friday, January 9, 2009

Democratizing 20th Century America 1-9-09

Read the Zinn handout pg. 213-227

Identify the following terms. Describe each in your own words. Provide a quote from the text. Discuss the connection to our unit's essential question: Why Then? Why did the Anti-War Movement get underway when it did?
You may construct a chart to organize your work.

1. Ho Chi Minh
2. Pentagon Papers
3. Chiang Kai-Shek
4. President Truman
5. Haiphong
6. National Security Council Memo
7. Ngo Dinh Diem
8. National Liberation Front
9. John Kennedy
10. Buddhist Monks
11. Lucien Conein
12. Lyndon Johnson
13. Gulf of Tonkin
14. Operation Phoenix
15. My Lai 4