Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework

Hey folks,

Sorry I forgot to post this.

Read 388-399

National Textile Workers Union
WWI Bonus Army
Stock Market Crash 1929
Grapes of Wrath
WWI Bonus Army
NRA
TVA
AAA

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth America

Read Zinn Chap 15 pg 377-387


In our next two units we will investigate the Labor Movement and the Civil Rights Movement. As you read I would like you to consider the questions: Why then? Why did the Labor Movement get underway when it did?

Assignment: After reading, I would like you to identify the following terms. You should draw a three column chart. Label as follows.

Column A - Point of View (What does Zinn want you to know, think and believe about this?)

Column B - Evidence (Quote the text)

Column C - Connections/Significance/Discussion (Why is this term important? How does this connect to the Labor Movement? How does this help you answer or begin to answer the EQ "why then"?)

Seattle General Strike
Establishment's Reaction to the Seattle Strike
Excerpt from The Nation
Immigration and Labor/Strikes/Strike Breaking
U. S. Policy Toward Immigrants during the 1920s
Marcus Garvey
Distribution of Wealth During the 1920s
F. Scott Fitzgerald
Sinclair Lewis
Fiorello La Guardia
stretch-out

Monday, December 6, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century -- More Debate Resources

www.kff.org/.../upload/Sex-Education-in-the-U-S-Policy-and-Politics.pdf

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century - More Debate Resources

http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/tgr/04/1/gr040109.html

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century - Debate Speech Suggestions

Debate Speech Structure
Affirmative 1
• Intro (Suggested)
a) Quote, statistics or vignette that connect to resolution
b) Restate resolution
• Background and Context
a) Define key terms
b) Rephrase resolution as modified by key terms
c) State and define teams values
• Value 1
a) Restate and define value
b) Discuss connection to resolution; present arguments
c) Present evidence to support arguments
d) Restate and redefine value
• Value 2 (If time)
a) Repeat steps above

Negative 1
• Challenge Affirmative’s major arguments and values
• Intro (Suggested)
a) Quote, statistics or vignette that connect to resolution
b) Restate resolution
• Background and Context
a) Define key terms
b) Rephrase resolution as modified by key terms
c) State and define teams values
• Value 1
a) Restate and define value
b) Discuss connection to resolution; present arguments
c) Present evidence to support arguments
d) Restate and redefine value
• Value 2 (If time)
a) Repeat steps above


Affirmative 2
• Challenge opponent’s values
• Challenge opponent’s arguments
• Value 2
a) Restate and define second value
b) Discuss connection to resolution; present arguments
c) Present evidence to support arguments


Negative 2
• Challenge opponent’s values
• Challenge opponent’s arguments
• Value 2
a) Restate and define second value
b) Discuss connection to resolution; present arguments

Democratizing Twentieth Century - Some Possible Resources

Democratizing 20th Century - Some Possible Resources for Debate
Relevant Cases

http://www.tourolaw.edu/Patch/Roe/

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0410_0113_ZS.html

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1901-1939/1922/1922_325/

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0381_0479_ZO.html

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/rights/landmark_casey.html

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/forum/january98/roe_1-30.html


Organizations

http://www.quaqua.org/

http://www.quaqua.org/standardreview.htm

http://reproductiverights.org/

http://www.prochoiceamerica.org/

http://www.operationrescue.org/

http://www.focusonthefamily.com/

www.prochoiceamerica.org/issues/sex-education/

http://www.now.org/

Online Publications and Magazines

http://www.newsweek.com/id/56801

http://www.freep.com/article/20091204/NEWS15/91204032/1320/Ad-targets-Stupak-amendment-on-abortion

http://www.bangordailynews.com/detail/131957.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1622610

http://www.nationalreview.com/

http://spectator.org/

http://www.weeklystandard.com/

http://www.thenation.com/

http://www.newyorker.com/

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.dailykos.com/

Miscellaneous Articles


http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-07-16-abortion-protest_x.htm

http://reproductiverights.org/en/press-room/court-strikes-down-mississippi-abortion-law-women-in-state-narrowly-escape-virtual-ban-on

http://health.usnews.com/blogs/on-parenting/2009/12/07/boys-miss-out-on-sex-education-talks-with-parents.html

http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=225332

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2009/12/08/teenagers-get-sex-education-internet-not-parents.html

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerletters/2009/12/filling_us_senate_vacancies_

Sunday, November 28, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century

I will post debate pairings later this afternoon.

Cope

Politics and Government Homework Due Nov 30

Hey Folks,

I'm not going to be in tomorrow so you can work on these questions tonight and in class tomorrow. The first half are due Tuesday, all sixteen must be complete by Wednesday

Based on Vidal pages 147-166

1. Discuss XYZ affair. Be sure to discuss all the major players involved and the controversy it sparked. What do you think Vidal is suggesting about the incident?(two quotes)
2. Discuss/describe the interaction between Marshall and Napoleon (one quote)
3. How did the Federalists react to the XYZ affair? (two quotes)
4. Why does Vidal keep calling Hamilton "General Hamilton?"
5. Discuss Napoleon's impact on France. (one quote)
6. What Marshal report to Adam's when he returned from France? (one quote)
7. Why do you think Vidal claim Hamilton wanted to be the "Napoleon of the West?" What might Hamilton and Napoleon have in common?
8. Who does Adams appoint as lieutenant commander and chief?
9. What was the Alien Act? What was the Sedition Act? What does Vidal want you to think about these act? What would be the reaction if such acts were passed today? Explain. (three quotes)
10. What is Bastille Day?
11. Discuss the Republicans reaction to the Alien and Sedition Acts. (one quote)
12. Discuss Hamilton's role in the military. (one quote)
13. Discuss Adams's comment about the British/French War. (one quote)
14. Why is there little evidence of Jefferson and Madison's correspondence during the Alien and Sedition Act crisis?
15. Discuss Jefferson and Madison's interpretation of the 10th amendment. Discuss the Va and Ky resolutions. Why were they controversial?
16. What is nullification?

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Poly Govt

For reading pgs 137-147, remember to take note of

a) John Adams as president--what he thinks, says and does (including foreign policy)** 2 quotes
b) John Marshall--thinks, says does
** 2 quotes
c) Primary source chart for Marshall excerpt on page 144
d) Identify the Supreme Court
**2 quotes

Monday, November 8, 2010

Politics and Government Homework

Chapter Five

pgs 99-109

1) What problems did the Americans have in the Mediterranean?

2) Why did the British hijack American ships?

3) "The fifth year of the American constitutional republic should have been a time of consolidation, as well as enjoyment of certain aspects of Hamilton's financial system." (pg 104)

What was Hamilton's economic system? Explain.

4) Adams voted for peace twice. What were the two instances in which he voted for peace?

5) Discuss Washington's role in the Whiskey Rebellion. Why was this event significant?

6) "Jefferson, aside from farming was now using his slaves to manufacture nails." (107) Why is this an example of Jefferson's "higher hypocrisy"?

7) Discuss the following quote of Jefferson speaking to Adams: "I am sure from the honesty of your heart, you join me in detestation of the corruption of the English government, and that no man on earth is more incapable than yourself of seeing that copied among us willingly." How might it be argued that Jefferson is attempting to manipulate Adams here?

8) Why was there so much opposition to John Jay's treaty amongst the Republicans?

Sunday, October 31, 2010

Democratizing 20th Century Review Sheet

Make sure you know about each term. Some of the list may be repeated as I copied and pasted this from several documents.

Required Readings: Zinn, Industrializing America, Battle for Suffrage

Espionage Act
American Protective League
Green Corn Rebellion
Jeanette Rankin
Kate Richards O'Hare
IWW Trials
Palmer Raids
Sacco and Vanzetti
Seneca Falls Convention
women's education/college
Grover Cleveland
Anna Garlin Spencer
Carrie Chapmann Catt
Alice Paul
Woodrow Wilson/Women's Suffrage
Woodrow Wilson/WWI
CPI
Fourteen Points
Nineteenth Amendment
anarcho-syndicalism
IWW (I know you did this term before, you must do it again)
free speech fights
The Preacher and the Slave
Joe Hill
Lawrence, MA (I expect a detailed discussion of these events)**
difference between the AFL and IWW
"One Big Union"
Rules for Female Teachers
Mark Twain
Upton Sinclair
Muckraker
J. P. Morgan, J. D. Rockefeller
Taylorism
Immigration and the Labor Force
Triangle Shirtwaist Company
International Ladies Garment Workers
Unionization/AFL
Samuel Gompers
Big Bill Heywood
IWW
mainstream reason cited for U.S. entry into WWI
2. unrestricted submarine warfare
3. Monroe Doctrine
4. Panama Canal
5. Spanish American War
6. The Jungle
7. 19th amendment

People to know:
1. Alice Paul
2. Woodrow Wilson
3. Upton Sinclair
4. Jane Addams
5. Mary Harris
6. William McKinley
7. Mother Mary Jones
8. Ida Tarbell
9. Kate Richards O’Hare
10. J. P. Morgan
11. Andrew Carnegie
12. Eugene Debbs
13. Samuel Gompers
14. Carrie Chapman Catt
15. Emma Goldman
16. Helen Keller
17. Mary Elizabeth Lease

Terms/Concepts to know and understand:

1. muckraker
2. Silent Sentinel
3. Marxist
4. scab labor
5. collective bargaining
6. imperialism
7. Taylorism
8. Reformist Motherhood
9. Political Motherhood
10. Republican Mothers
11. Socialist Woman

Organizations to know:
1. NAWSA
2. AFL
3. WP
4. IWW
5. WCTU

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Politics and Government Homework

Read document packet essay The Antifederalists: The Other Founders of the American Constitutional Tradition? by Saul Cornell

Annotate

If you "lost" or "never got" packet:



http://www.gilderlehrman.org/historynow/09_2007/historian6.php

Sunday, October 24, 2010

Poltics and Government Homework

1) Current Events
2) Read Vidal Chap 4 65-76. Select five quotes and for each discuss:
a) What Vidal wants you to know, think believe
b) The connection to the E. Q. How Democraic is the Constitution
c) Why you picked the quote; its significance in the book.
(Each answer should be at least several sentences)

New Vocab:

Esteemed: having an illustrious reputation; respected; "our esteemed leader"; "a prestigious author"

Proto: indicating the first or earliest or original; "`proto' is a combining form in a word like `protolanguage' that refers to the hypothetical ancestor of another language or group of languages"

Inalienable: 1 - incapable of being repudiated or transferred to another; "endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights"
2 - unforfeitable: not subject to forfeiture; "an unforfeitable right"

unscrupulous: Without scruples, immoral; Contemptuous of what is right or honorable

commensurate: proportionate; of a similar measurable standard

scurvy: 1 - a condition caused by deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) 2 - of the most contemptible kind; "abject cowardice"; "a low stunt to pull"; "a low-down sneak"; "his miserable treatment of his family"; "You miserable skunk!"; "a scummy rabble"; "a scurvy trick"

indelible - cannot be removed or erased; "an indelible stain"; "indelible memories"

incarnate – 1 - represent in bodily form; "He embodies all that is evil wrong with the system"; "The painting substantiates the feelings of the artist" 2 - invested with a bodily form especially of a human body; "a monarch...regarded as a god incarnate"

augur: predict from an omen; bode

allure: tempt: dispose or incline or entice to; "We were tempted by the delicious-looking food"

intrepid: without fear; "fearlessly, he led the troops into combat"

assert: affirm: to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true; "Before God I swear I am innocent"

megalomaniac: Megalomania is a non-clinical word defined as: 1 - A psychopathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence. 2 - An obsession with grandiose or extravagant things or actions.

Protocol: 1 - forms of ceremony and etiquette observed by diplomats and heads of state
2 - code of correct conduct; "safety protocols"; "academic protocol"

in esse: in existence

in posse: in possibility, having a potential to exist, in potential but not in actuality, (contradistinguished by in esse); in possibility, having a potential to exist, in potential but not in actuality, (contradistinguished by in esse)

somber: drab: lacking brightness or color; dull; "drab faded curtains"; "sober Puritan grey"; "children in somber brown clothes"

commencement: beginning: the time at which something is supposed to begin

Saturday, October 23, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework

For the past several weeks we have been studying the Industrial Revolution as a context for understanding how and why women got the right to vote when they did. In your next essay, you will discuss the Women's Suffrage Movement. You will demonstrate your understanding of this movement--its roots, its successes and its limitations. You will also demostrate your understanding of the historic context, including the rise of socialism and Progressivism.

In this essay you must include evidence obtained from the following sources:

a) Howard Zinn - "The Socialist Challenge" and "War is the Health of the State"
b) Kerber, De Hart - "Industrializing America"
c) Who Built America? - "Woman Suffrage", "Factory Reform and the Conditions of Labor", "The Garment Industry and Working Women's Activism", "Socialist, Marxists and Anarchists" **(this book is only available in class and yuo must use class time to take your notes)
d) Women's Suffrage Packet

Your essay should respond to the Essential Questions:

a) Why then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

b) What gains were won? What gains were sought but not won?

c) If this reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?

An A paper will:

--answer all of the questions, either as past of one contiguous essay or in three seperate sections; the thrust of the essay should be behind answering the a) why then? question
--contain a sophisticated, provocative thesis, supported by 3 arguments
--contain 3 cogent and sophisticated arguments that support the organizing
idea/thesis
--argue well developed, original ideas and illustrate new understanding
of the topic
--persuasively use evidence from Zinn, Industrializing America, Who Built America and Battle for Suffrage packets; contain at least five or six quotes from Zinn and five from the other readings
--discuss both the authors' and primary source perspectives about events
--persuasively use evidence from an outside source
--be well organized, containing a clear introduction that presents the thesis in a highly engaging,compelling manner, followed by smooth transitions from one idea to the next, with a conclusion that synthesizes the different strands and arguments
--demonstrate a clear understanding of the historical time period and demonstrate the cause and effect relationship between significant events
--conform to the conventions of grammar, spelling and punctuation, and be thouroughly proofread and include the signature of one adult to whom it was read aloud

For tomorrow, please bring a tentative thesis for this essay. You might try something like this -- "The social and economic changes brought about by industrialization provided new routes through which woman could obtain the right to vote." or "While college educated women were important leaders within the Women's Suffrage Movement, the right to vote for women could not have been achieved without the working class." or "Industrialization, immigration, education and World War I were key forces that helped women seize the right to vote during the early Twentieth Century."

Once you have a thesis, please construct 2-3 arguments in support of the thesis.

For each argument, list 3 quotes you will use to support.

You can set this up, but take care to make it neat and organized. Be prepared to share with the rest of the class. Use your notes fro class and homework to assist you.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Democratizing 20th Century America Homework

1) Select five quotes from your readings (War is the Health of the State and Battle for Suffrage) that support the following statement:

The timing of World War I was integral to the success of the Women's Suffrage Movement.

Explain each quotes connection to the aforementioned statement, using at least several sentences for each.

Politics and Government Homework

1) Please remember your 2 page reflection about Freakonomics (typed, double spaced)

2) Please remember your current event reports

3) Read the second essay (James Madison and the Constitution by Jack Rakove) in the packet I handed out on Friday and make some notes for yourself.

4) Please make sure you have finished at least the first 3 chapters in Inventing a Nation

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Politics and Government - New Vocabulary

Ingenuity: the process of applying ideas to solve problems or meet challenges.

Promulgated: the act of formally proclaiming or declaring a new statutory or administrative law as in effect after it receives final approval.

Parable: a brief, succinct story, in prose or verse, that illustrates a moral or religious lesson.

Tact: consideration in dealing with others and avoiding giving offense

Viable: capable of being done with means at hand and circumstances as they are

Metaphysical: pertaining to or of the nature of metaphysics; "metaphysical philosophy"

Existential: derived from experience or the experience of existence

Demurely: Standards of modesty (also called demureness or reticence) are aspects of the culture of a country or people, at a given point in time, and is a measure against which an individual in society may be judged.

Palladium: a silver-white metallic element of the platinum group that resembles platinum

Invariably: without variation or change, in every case; "constantly kind and gracious"; "he always arrives on time"

Locutions: a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

Plutarch: a lunar impact crater that lies near the north-northeastern limb of the Moon, just to the south of the irregular crater Seneca

Exalted: of high moral or intellectual value; elevated in nature or style; "an exalted ideal"; "argue in terms of high-flown ideals"

Demonstrable: capable of being demonstrated or proved; "obvious lies"; "a demonstrable lack of concern for the general welfare"

Mediocrities: The assumptions of mediocrity principle is the notion in philosophy of science that there is nothing special about humans or the Earth.

Aide-de-Camp: an officer who acts as military assistant to a more senior officer

Envisaged: form a mental image of something that is not present or that is not the case; "Can you conceive of him as the president?"

Passive: lacking in energy or will

Eminence: high status importance owing to marked superiority; "a scholar of great eminence"

Demagogue: a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular passions and prejudices

Progenitors: an ancestor in the direct line

Dutiful: willingly obedient out of a sense of duty and respect; "a dutiful child"; "a dutiful citizen"

Reluctant: loath: unwillingness to do something contrary to your custom; "a reluctant smile"; "loath to admit a mistake"

Desultory: marked by lack of definite plan or regularity or purpose; jumping from one thing to another; "desultory thoughts"

Derive: come from; be connected by a relationship

Minuscule: of or relating to a small cursive script developed from uncial; 7th to 9th centuries

Reconcile: make (one thing) compatible with (another); "The scientists had to accommodate the new results with the existing theories"

Prescient: perceiving the significance of events before they occur

Despotism: a form of government by a single authority, either an individual (Despot), or tightly knit group, which rules with absolute political power.

Maxims: a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits

Arbiter: someone with the power to settle matters at will; "she was the final arbiter on all matters of fashion"

Surrogates: someone who takes the place of another person

Prose: ordinary writing as distinguished from verse

Odious: in an offensive and hateful manner

Demur: a pleading in a lawsuit that objects to an earlier pleading filed by an opposing party

Indiscreetly: without discretion or wisdom or self-restraint; "she inquired indiscreetly after the state of his health"

Deliberations: the process in which a jury in a trial in court discusses in private the findings of the court and decides by vote with which argument to agree of either opposing side.

Anomaly: deviation from the normal or common order or form or rule

Loftily: elevated in style, tone, or sentiment, as writings or speech

Folklore: the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture

Conciliation: the state of manifesting goodwill and cooperation after being reconciled; "there was a brief period of conciliation but the fighting soon resumed"

Vantage: place or situation affording some advantage (especially a comprehensive view or commanding perspective)

Commenced: get down: take the first step or steps in carrying out an action

Subtlety: the quality of being difficult to detect or analyze; "you had to admire the subtlety of the distinctions he drew"

Indolent: disinclined to work or exertion

Constituent: an artifact that is one of the individual parts of which a composite entity is made up; especially a part that can be separated from or attached to a system

Delegation: the assignment of authority and responsibility to another person (normally from a manager to a subordinate) to carry out specific activities.

Hypergamist: the act or practice of seeking a spouse of equal or higher socioeconomic status, or caste status than oneself.

Condescended: behave in a patronizing and condescending manner

Reputedly: Pertaining to a reputation accorded to another; Pertaining to that which is supposed or assumed to be true

Laudanum: narcotic consisting of an alcohol solution of opium or any preparation in which opium is the main ingredient

Rustic: characteristic of rural life

Mediocrity: ordinariness as a consequence of being average and not outstanding

Writhe: to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling); "The prisoner writhed in discomfort"; "The child tried to wriggle free from his aunt's embrace

Nettle: sting with or as with nettles and cause a stinging pain or sensation

Ad Hoc: for or concerned with one specific purpose; "a coordinated policy instead of ad hoc decisions"

Annexation: the formal act of acquiring something (especially territory) by conquest or occupation

Renounced: give up, such as power, as of monarchs and emperors, or duties and obligations

Overture: something that serves as a preceding event or introduces what follows

Congenial: suitable to your needs; "a congenial atmosphere to work in"

Desultory: marked by lack of definite plan or regularity or purpose; jumping from one thing to another; "desultory thoughts"

Exuberant: unrestrained, especially with regard to feelings

Ceded: the assignment of property to another entity

Unprecedented: having no precedent; novel; "an unprecedented expansion in population and industry"

Brood: think moodily or anxiously about something

Amiable: disposed to please; "an amiable villain with a cocky sidelong grin"

Astute: Quick at seeing how to gain advantage, especially for oneself; shrewd; critically discerning

Fin De Siecle: relating to or characteristic of the end of a century (especially the end of the 19th century)

Anglophone: Any person, of whatever ethnic origin or mother tongue, whose first official language is English.

Maritime: relating to or involving ships or shipping or navigation or seamen

Despotism: a form of government by a single authority, either an individual (Despot), or tightly knit group, which rules with absolute political power.

Inevitable: incapable of being avoided or prevented

Paradoxically: seemingly contradictory but nonetheless possibly true; "it is paradoxical that standing is more tiring than walking"

Indulged: to yield to an inclination or desire; allow oneself to follow one's will

Avarice: insatiable desire for wealth (personified as one of the deadly sins)

Solemnly: in a grave and sedate manner; "the judge sat there solemnly"

Populist: the political doctrine that supports the rights and powers of the common people in their struggle with the privileged elite; most famous for their advocacy of the free coinage of silver money and government control of monopolies.

Nemesis: something causing misery or death

Neofeudal: "new feudalism" and implies a contemporary rebirth of policies of governance and economy reminiscent of those present in many pre-industrial feudal societies

Venality: a vice associated with being bribeable or of selling your services or power, especially when one should act justly instead

Perversion: a curve that reverses the direction of something; "the tendrils of the plant exhibited perversion"

Subsequent: Following, afterwards in either time or place

Hereditary: A trait that is transmitted genetically from one generation to the next.

Superseded: take the place or move into the position of

Brooded: think moodily or anxiously about something

Intricacies: intricate character or state

Abhorrent: utterly opposed, or contrary, or in conflict

Votaries: a person who is bound by solemn religious vows, as a monk or a nun.

Ermine: the expensive white fur of the ermine

Turbulent: characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination

Seldom: infrequently, rarely

Acquisition: the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something

Theoreticians: someone who theorizes (especially in science or art)

Dwindled: become smaller or lose substance; "Her savings dwindled down"

Vigorously: strong and active physically or mentally

Exploited: taken advantage of

Lapidary: an expert on precious stones and the art of cutting and engraving them

Isolationism: a policy of nonparticipation in international economic and political relations

Stratagems: A confidence trick or confidence game

Bubonic: often fatal disease characterized by fever, chills, prostration, delirium, and buboes

Decimate: kill one in every ten, as of mutineers in Roman armies

Ramshackle: In disrepair or disorder; poorly maintained

Adjacent: nearest in space or position; immediately adjoining without intervening space

Politics and Government Homework

Make sure you complete the character graphic organizer. Keep up with your reading.

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework

Read Zinn pgs 365-376

Construct a three column chart.
'
In the first column (P.O.V.), least each of the following terms and describe each in your own words. Discuss what Howard Zinn wants you to know, think and believe.

In the second column, (Evidence) include a quote(s) for each term. The quote should clearly illustrate the thinking behind your summary in column one.

In the third column (Significance/Connections) explain why the term is important in the context of our unit: Democracy and equality for women--The right to vote--Why then? And/or consider the term's connection to industrialization, socialism, imperialism, secret alliances, nationalism or militarism.

a) Samuel Gompers
b) Charles Schenck
c) Espionage Act
d) "shouting fire in a crowded theater"/Schenck v U. S.
e) Eugene Debs/Espionage Act
f) American Protective League
g) draft resistance
h) Jeanette Rankin
i) Kate Richards O'hare
j) Palmer Raids
l) Sacco and Vanzetti

Vocabulary

proclaim: declare formally; declare someone to be something; of titles; "He was proclaimed King"

deliberation: (usually plural) discussion of all sides of a question; "the deliberations of the jury"

obstruct: hinder or prevent the progress or accomplishment of; "His brother blocked him at every turn"

unanimous: solid; acting together as a single undiversified whole; "a solid voting bloc"

Prussia: Former name of Germany; the Prussian Empire

acquiescence: acceptance without protest

vigilante: someone who illegally punishes someone for perceived offenses, or participates in a group which metes out extrajudicial punishment to such a person

sedition: an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government

treason: a crime that undermines the offender's government

atrocity: wicked act

conscription: the military draft

medieval: referring to the Middle Ages

despotism: absolute monarchy, dictatorship

cumulative: increasing by successive addition; "the benefits are cumulative"; "the eventual accumulative effect of these substances"

disillusion: disenchantment; freeing from false belief or illusions

diplomat: an official engaged in international negotiations

seclusion: to shut off or keep apart, as from company, society, etc.; withdraw from society or into solitude: as, to seclude oneself from the world; To shut or keep out; exclude; preclude

imminent: about to happen

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework -- October 6

Read Zinn "War is the Health of the State" pages 359-365

Why did Sean Wadsworth propose a draft?

How/why do you think British military requirements changed over time?

How did industrialization impact the nature of war?

What was “no man’s land?”

Discuss the impact of media coverage.

Why did Wilson enter the war?

Discuss the William Jennings Bryant quote: “…opened the doors of all weaker countries to an invasion of American capital and enterprise.
How does this quote connect to the concept of imperialism?

Why did W. E. B. DuBois call the war a "Battle for Africa"?

Compare the Committee on Public Information, the Socialist and the Alliance for Labor and Democracy's stances on the War.

Politics and Government Homework -- October 6

For Section 1 (internship) -- complete a primary source analysis sheet for Madison quote excerpted from the Federalist 49 (pg 15).


For Section 4 (non-internship) -- we had a fire drill, please keep up with the reading and be prepared to share your interperation of the quote listed above.

Monday, October 4, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century America Homework 10-4

Read Howard Zinn pgs 347-357

Construct a three column chart.
'
In the first column (P.O.V.), least each of the following terms and describe each in your own words. Discuss what Howard Zinn wants you to know, think and believe.

In the second column, (Evidence) include a quote(s) for each term. The quote should clearly illustrate the thinking behind your summary in column one.

In the third column (Significance/Connections) explain why the term is important in the context of our unit: Democracy and equality for women--The right to vote--Why then? Consider the terms connection to industrialization, socialism, labor unions, women's suffrage or immigration.

a) Progressive Era (please read the entire section before attempting to complete this term)

b) Blacks and Socialism

c) The Niagara Movement

d) Progressive Reform Legislation--amendments and specific acts

e) Pujo Committee

f) Theodore Roosevelt

g) Liberalism

h) National Civil Federation

i) Ludlow Massacre

Answer the following question in about a paragraph:

Zinn seems to be critical of Progressive Reform and reformers. Why do you think this is so? Why does he doubt the stated intentions of progressives?

Vocabulary

nadir: an extreme state of adversity; the lowest point of anything; the point below the observer that is directly opposite the zenith on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected

progressive: favoring or promoting reform (often by government action)

repudiate: disown: cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"

peonage: the practice of making a debtor work for his creditor until the debt is discharged

disenfranchise: (also called disenfranchisement) is the revocation of the right of suffrage (the right to vote) to a person or group of people, or rendering a person's vote less effective, or ineffective. Disfranchisement might occur explicitly through law, or implicitly by intimidation. ...

agitate: try to stir up public opinion; cause to be agitated, excited, or roused; "The speaker charged up the crowd with his inflammatory remarks"

militant: disposed to warfare or hard-line policies; "militant nations"; "hawkish congressman"; "warlike policies"

provocative: serving or tending to provoke, excite, or stimulate; stimulating discussion or exciting controversy; "a provocative remark"; "a provocative smile"; "provocative Irish tunes which...compel the hearers to dance"- Anthony Trollope

indignation: a feeling of righteous anger

spearhead: someone who leads or initiates an activity (attack or campaign etc.)

submissive: inclined or willing to submit to orders or wishes of others or showing such inclination; "submissive servants"; "a submissive reply"; "replacing troublemakers with more submissive people"

embody: incarnate: represent in bodily form; "He embodies all that is evil wrong with the system"; "The painting substantiates the feelings of the artist"

sanction: An approval, by an authority, that makes something valid; A penalty, or some coercive measure, intended to ensure compliance; especially one adopted by several nations, or by an international body; A law, treaty, or contract, or a clause within a law, treaty, or contract, specifying the above ...

trust: Trust-busting is any government activity designed to break up trusts or monopolies. Theodore Roosevelt is the U.S. president most associated with dissolving trusts. However, William Howard Taft signed twice as much trust-busting legislation during his presidency.

manifesto: a public declaration of intentions (as issued by a political party or government)

novel: pleasantly new or different; "common sense of a most refreshing sort"

municipal: A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly denotes a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. A municipality is typically governed by a mayor and a city council or municipal council.

impetus: drift: a force that moves something along; impulse: the act of applying force suddenly; "the impulse knocked him over"

tacit: Done or made in silence; implied, but not expressed; silent; as, tacit consent is consent by silence, or by not interposing an objection; Not derived from formal principles of reasoning; based on induction rather than deduction

anarchist: Anarchism is a political philosophy which considers the state undesirable, unnecessary and harmful, and instead promotes a stateless society, or anarchy.

memorandum: memo, written proposal or reminder

atrocity: the quality of being shockingly cruel and inhumane

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Democratizning Twentieth Century Homework

Hey folk, sorry I forgot about you again. I want make a habit of it---I'm sure you're really disappointed :)

Please select any four quotes from Zinn pgs 321-347 that would help you support the argument: Industrialization created a climate that made suffrage more attainable for women.

For each quote, explain in several sentences how the quote supports your argument.

Friday, October 1, 2010

Politics and Government Response Essay --DUE NOV 8-- How Democratic is the Constitution? --

An A paper will:

--answer the question: How Democratic is the Constitution?
--contain a sophisticated, provocative thesis, supported by 3 arguments
--contain 3 cogent and sophisticated arguments that support the organizing
idea/thesis
--argue well developed, original ideas and illustrate new understanding
of the topic
--persuasively use evidence from Vidal, Zinn, Wood and HistoryNow handout; contain at least five or six quotes from Vidal and five from the other readings
--discuss both the authors' and the Constitutional Framers perspectives about events
--persuasively use evidence from an outside source
--be well organized, containing a clear introduction that presents the thesis in a highly engaging,compelling manner, followed by smooth transitions from one idea to the next, with a conclusion that synthesizes the different strands and arguments
--demonstrate a clear understanding of the historical time period and demonstrate the cause and effect relationship between significant events
--conform to the conventions of grammar, spelling and punctuation, and be thouroughly proofread and include the signature of one adult to whom it was read aloud


A B paper will:

--answer the question: How Democratic is the Constitution?
--contain a fairly sophisticated, thesis, supported by 3 arguments
--contain 3 cogent that arguments support the organizing
idea/thesis
--argue well developed, ideas and illustrate an understanding
of the topic
--persuasively use evidence from Vidal, Zinn, Wood and HistoryNow handout; contain at least five quotes from Vidal and four to five from the other readings
--discuss both the authors' and the Constitutional Framers perspectives about events
--persuasively use evidence from an outside source
--be well organized, containing a clear introduction that presents the thesis in a compelling manner, followed by smooth transitions from one idea to the next, with a conclusion that synthesizes the different strands and arguments
--demonstrate a clear understanding of the historical time period and demonstrate the cause an effect relationship between significant events
--conform to the conventions of grammar, spelling and punctuation

A C paper will:

--answer the question: How Democratic is the Constitution?
--contain a thesis, supported by 2-3 arguments
--contain 2-3 arguments that support the organizing
idea/thesis
--argue well developed, ideas and illustrate new understanding
of the topic
--use evidence from Vidal, Zinn, Wood and HistoryNow handout; contain at least five quotes from Vidal and five from the other readings
--discuss the authors' and/or the Constitutional Framers perspectives about events
--use evidence from an outside source
--be organized, containing an introduction that presents the thesis, followed by transitions from one idea to the next, with a conclusion that synthesizes the different strands and arguments
--demonstrate an understanding of the historical time period and demonstrate the cause an effect relationship between significant events
--mostly conform to the conventions of grammar, spelling and punctuation

A D paper will:

--attempt to answer the question: How Democratic is the Constitution?
--contain a thesis, supported by 2 arguments
--contain 2 arguments that support the organizing
idea/thesis
--argue well developed, ideas and illustrate new understanding
of the topic
--use evidence from Vidal, Zinn, Wood and HistoryNow handout; contain at least five quotes from Vidal and five from the other readings
--discuss the authors' and/or the Constitutional Framers perspectives about events
--be organized, containing an introduction that presents the thesis, followed by transitions from one idea to the next, with a conclusion that synthesizes the different strands and arguments
--demonstrate limited understanding of the historical time period and cause and effect relationship between significant events
--poorly conform to the conventions of grammar, spelling and punctuation

Politics and Government -- Inventing a Nation -- Reading Schedule

There will be daily assignments that correspond to the readings.
You should have read each chapter by the date listed

October 6 -- pgs 13-27

October 8 -- Chap 2

October 12 -- Chap 3

October 15 -- Chap 4

October 20 -- Chap 5

October 25 -- Chap 6

October 29 -- Chap 7

Response Paper 5 pages, 12 pt font, double spaced: How Democratic is the Constitution? Due November 8th

**If you become my sponsee for a history exhibition, your paper should be 6 pages.

Politics and Government Homework

Unit 1: How Democratic is the Constitution?

We are going to start our whole class text-- Inventing a Nation, by Gore Vidal.

This will be challenging text. I anticipate some of you will have a little trouble, but they pay me the big bucks to help you. Don't give up!

Look over this vocabulary list first. I advise you print out a copy and keep it next to you as you read.


Please complete the assignment that follows the list.

“Crossing the Rubicon” – to go to a point of no return.

Meticulous: taking or showing extreme care about minute details

Revenue: the income of government from taxation, excise duties, customs, or other sources, appropriated to the payment of the public expenses.

Transmutation: change into another nature, substance, form, or condition.

Proviso: a clause in a statute, contract, or the like, by which a condition is introduced.

Dividends: that part of the earnings of a corporation that is distributed to its shareholders; usually paid quarterly

Legislature: a type of deliberative assembly with the power to pass, amend and repeal laws.

Nurtured: help develop; provide with nourishment

Iconic: generally represents an object or concept with great cultural significance to a wide cultural group.

Retrogressive: A deterioration or decline to a previous state; A return to a less complex condition

Guineas: a former British gold coin worth 21 shillings / a republic in western Africa on the Atlantic; formerly a French colony

Tottering: unsteady in gait as from infirmity or old age; "a tottering skeleton of a horse"; "a tottery old man"

Quorum: a gathering of the minimal number of members of an organization to conduct business

Mitigated: made less severe or intense; "he gladly accepted the mitigated penalty"

Onerous: not easily borne; wearing; "the burdensome task of preparing the income tax return"

Subservient: compliant and obedient to authority

Plenipotentiary: a diplomat who is fully authorized to represent his or her government

Commercial: Pertaining to commerce and having either monetary or non-monetary gain as motive

Armory: a collection of resources; "he dipped into his intellectual armory to find an answer"

Debtors: an entity that owes a debt to someone else. The entity may be an individual, a firm, a government, a company or other legal person.

Rhetoric: using language effectively to please or persuade

Exertion: use of physical or mental energy; hard work; "he got an A for effort"; "they managed only with great exertion"

Disingenuous: not straightforward or candid; giving a false appearance of frankness

Inadequate: lacking the requisite qualities or resources to meet a task

Supple: moving and bending with ease

Creed: any system of principles or beliefs

Anarchy: a state of lawlessness and disorder (usually resulting from a failure of government)

Archetypal: representing or constituting an original type after which other similar things are patterned

Antidemocratic: opposing the democratic process or democracy, especially by the use of force; enforcing views contrary to that of a majority of the public

Attainder: attainder or attinctura is the metaphorical 'stain' or 'corruption of blood' which arises from being condemned for a serious capital crime (felony or treason)

Pellucid: allowing for the passage of light; transparent; easily understood; clear

Engorged: Of or pertaining to something that is overly filled with fluid

Inalienable Rights: Some philosophers and political scientists make a distinction between natural and legal rights.

Implicit: implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"

Read pages 1-13
Answer the following questions. Each answer should be several sentences and, whenever possible, make connections to the Zinn chapter "A Kind of Revolution" or the Declaration of Independence that you read and analyzed.


1. Discuss this quote: "George Washington...was serioulsy broke."
Why was George Washington having financial problems? How did his social class and reputation contribute to these problems?

2. Why was there concern about the Articles of Confederation?

3. Explain in detail the difference between Federalists and Anti-Federalists. Include the role of regional differences in you answers.

4. Discuss this quote: "In this crisis there were no Federalists, no future Republicans: only frightened men of property."
What is the crisis? Why does the author of the book want you to know think and believe after reading this statement? Explain.

5. What was the initial purpose of the Philidelphia convention? Why was Wahington conflicted about attending? Why was his presence needed?

6. Describe the new government formed by the Constitution. How did the new Constitution deal with slavery?

Do not forget to complete a current event report!!
These folks present:

Kirosa, Nia, Maurice

Yazmin, Nikki, Ricard, Juile

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Politics and Government

Read Zinn 96-102

Answer the following questions. Use the vocabulary list to assist you as you read.

1. Discuss the right to vote in the new Constitution.

2. Zinn suggests that there is more to democracy than voting. What does he mean?

3. What was the basis for the "factionsal struggles that were developing?"

4. Why does Zinn seem to doubt that the "government...maintain[s] peace...as a referee between two equally matched fighters"?

5. Discuss the quote from Madidison in Federalist #10. What does he want people to know, think believe?


6. Discuss the compromise between Northern business and Southern slaveholders.

7. Why do you think the Constitution protected "life, liberty and property" instead of the pursuit of happiness?

8. Write several sentences to describe the following terms. Include a quote for each.
a) Bill of Rights
b) Sedition Act
c) Whiskey Rebellion

popular election: universal suffrage (also universal adult suffrage, general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to adult citizens (or subjects) as a whole, though it may also mean extending said right to minors and non-citizens.

tumultuous: disruptive, characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination; "effects of the struggle will be violent and disruptive"; "riotous times"; "these troubled areas"; "the tumultuous years of his administration"; "a turbulent and unruly childhood"

faction/factional: in politics, a political faction is a grouping of like-minded individuals, especially within a political organization, such as a political party, a trade union, or other group.

unison: corresponding exactly; "marching in unison"
occurring together or simultaneously; "the two spoke in unison"

apt: naturally disposed toward; "he is apt to ignore matters he considers unimportant"; "I am not minded to answer any questions"

pervade: to be in every part of; to spread through

tempestuous: stormy, characterized by violent emotions or behavior; "a stormy argument"; "a stormy marriage"

repress: put down by force or intimidation; "The government quashes any attempt of an uprising"; "China keeps down her dissidents very efficiently"; "The rich landowners subjugated the peasants working the land"

insurrection: rebellion, organized opposition to authority; a conflict in which one faction tries to wrest control from another

delusion: a fixed belief that is either false, fanciful, or derived from deception. Psychiatry defines the term more specifically as a belief that is pathological (the result of an illness or illness process). ...

lament: a cry of sorrow and grief; "their pitiful laments could be heard throughout the ward"

illicit: contrary to accepted morality (especially sexual morality) or convention; "an illicit association with his secretary"

delegate: a person appointed or elected to represent others

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Native American vs. Indian vs. American Indian vs. Amerindian

In our discussions about U. S. History, I may use reference groups of people in different ways as a means to contextualize a time period. For instance, Negro suffrage may be used in reference to the fourteenth amendment.

To address the concern about the use of "Indian": This term is both a historic reference and it be a politically correct term, though the proper term is "American Indian." I have tried to gather a little evidence. Here are a couple of links, albeit one is from wikipedia.

http://www.inthesetimes.com/article/3027/a_politically_correct_lexicon/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_name_controversy

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/american-indians/

http://www.americanindian.net/

Saturday, September 25, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century/Poltics and Government HW

Hey folks. I'll be away until tomorrow afternoon, I will post some vocabulary tomorrow night. Poly Govt students should complete a current event. Democratizing students should complete the secondary source sheet for "Industrializing America"

Check blog tomorrow.

Have a good weekend.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century Homework

Read 328-339 in Zinn. Answer the following questions using complete sentences. Include a quote from the text to support your answer.

1) Compare the AFL with the IWW. Construct a Venn Diagram and write several sentences.

2) What is a general strike? What would that look like in New York City?

3) Discuss the tacticts of the IWW. In what ways did they organize workers? What tacticts did they use to help workers resist oppression?

4) Select and discuss 2 quotes that illustrate the impact of immigration on the IWW. Where were these immigrants from?

5) Construct a primary source analysis chart for "Rules for Female Teachers".

6) Discuss the excerpt from the Handbook of the Women's Trade Industrial League. In what ways are the concept of Taylorism expressed? Can you make any connections to the Women's Suffrage Movement?

longshoreman: a laborer who loads and unloads vessels in a port

militant: disposed to warfare or hard-line policies; "militant nations"; "hawkish congressman"; "warlike policies"

persistance: the property of a continuous and connected period of time

ordinance: regulation, an authoritative rule, a statute enacted by a city government

Politics and Government Homework

Read Zinn handout pages 86-96
Answer the following questions. Use the vocabulary list below to help with yor reading. I advise that you print it out so it is handy as you read.

1) Compare the British relationship with Indians to the French relationship with Indians.

2) Discuss the British use of biological warfare.

3) Why did Inidans side with the British during the Revolution?

4) Reflect on Zinn's discussion of blacks before and after the Revolution.
a) Why did slavery expand in the South and not the North?
b) Discuss the demands that free blacks made on society.
c) Prepare a primary source analysis chart for Banneker's letter to Jefferson.

5) Compare and contrast the opinions of Charles Beard and George Bankcroft regarding the Constitution.

6) List the economic interests groups who attended the Constitutional COnvention.

7) What prompted Shays' Rebellion? Consider both economic and political reasons.


inexorable: unable to be persuaded; relentless; unrelenting; impossible to stop or prevent; inevitable; adamant; severe

subdue: repress, put down by force or intimidation; "The government quashes any attempt of an uprising"; "China keeps down her dissidents very efficiently"; "The rich landowners subjugated the peasants working the land"

coexistance: exist together

intricate: having many complexly arranged elements; elaborate; "intricate lacework"

swindling: victimize, deprive of by deceit; "He swindled me out of my inheritance"; "She defrauded the customers who trusted her"; "the cashier gypped me when he gave me too little change", the act of swindling by some fraudulent scheme; "that book is a fraud"

provincial: of or associated with a province; "provincial government"

redress: damages, a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury

acquaint: introduce, cause to come to know personally; "permit me to acquaint you with my son"; "introduce the new neighbors to the community"

cede: give over, surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another

negotiate: discuss the terms of an arrangement; "They negotiated the sale of the house"

guerilla: a member of an irregular armed force that fights a stronger force by sabotage and harassment

expedition: a military campaign designed to achieve a specific objective in a foreign country

cession: that which is ceded. Insurance: (part of) a risk which is transferred from one actor to another; The transfer of a personal claim from a cedent to a cessionary

multiplicity: the property of being multiple, numerousness, a large number

bulwark: a protective structure of stone or concrete; extends from shore into the water to prevent a beach from washing away

amid: surrounded by; in the middle of; in the center of

evade: avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues); "He dodged the issue"; "she skirted the problem"; "They tend to evade their responsibilities"; "he evaded the questions skillfully"

rhetoric: using language effectively to please or persuade

apprehend: appreciated, fully understood or grasped; "dangers not yet appreciated"; "these apprehended truths"; "a thing comprehended is a thing known as fully as it can be known"

conceive: have the idea for; "He conceived of a robot that would help paralyzed patients"; "This library was well conceived"
think, judge or regard; look upon; judge; "I think he is very smart"; "I believe her to be very smart"; "I think that he is her boyfriend"; "The racist conceives such people to be inferior"

exert: put to use; "exert one's power or influence"

attest: provide evidence for; stand as proof of; show by one's behavior, attitude, or external attributes; "His high fever attested to his illness"; "The buildings in Rome manifest a high level of architectural sophistication"; "This decision demonstrates his sense of fairness"

censure: harsh criticism or disapproval

endowment: natural abilities or qualities
(2) the capital that provides income for an institution
(3)the act of endowing with a permanent source of income; "his generous endowment of the laboratory came just in the nick of time"

prevail: predominate: be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance; "Money reigns supreme here"; "Hispanics predominate in this neighborhood"

sentiment: tender, romantic, or nostalgic feeling or emotion

concurrent: occurring or operating at the same time; "a series of coincident events"

imbibed: absorb, take in, also metaphorically; "The sponge absorbs water well"; "She drew strength from the minister's words"

consonant: accordant, in keeping; "salaries agreeable with current trends"; "plans conformable with your wishes"; "expressed views concordant with his background"

redemption: (theology) the act of delivering from sin or saving from evil
(2) repayment of the principal amount of a debt or security at or before maturity (as when a corporation repurchases its own stock)
(3) the act of purchasing back something previously sold

maxim: a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits

imprudence: a lack of caution in practical affairs, unwise

opulence: deluxe, rich and superior in quality; "a princely sum"; "gilded dining rooms"

Monday, September 20, 2010

Politics and Government Homework

Unit 1: How Democratic is the Constitution?

Read pages 87-86 in "A Kind of Revolution"
Answer each of the following questions using SEVERAL COMPLETE SENTENCES. Include at least one quote that helped you determine your answer. Use the vocabulary list below to help with complex passages.

1. Which segments of the population supported the war, which were against and which were neutral? Why do you think this was the case?

2. Which groups in were not allowed to participate in the Revolutionary Militia? Why do you think they were forbidden?

3. Discuss the findings of historian John Shy. What does he seem to be suggesting about the relationship between social class and war?

4. Discuss the Connecticut draft. Do you think this draft was democratic? Why or why not?

5. How do the soldiers react to Robert Morris?

6. Why might one describe the Maryland constitution as aristocratic?

7. Discuss concerns about poor whites as they related to blacks.

8. Zinn seems to be suggesting that the war was more about class than independence. Provide three quotes that support his claim. Explain why you have selected each quote.

commissary: someone delegated by a superior to execute a duty or an office; in a formal, legal context, one who has received power from a legitimate superior authority to pass judgment in a certain cause or to take information concerning it

recalcitrant: marked by a stubborn unwillingness to obey figures of authority; hard to deal with or operate

impressment: the act of compelling men to serve in a navy by force and without notice

conscription: the draft, call-up or national service

cognizant: being fully aware or having knowledge of something

viz: namely, as follows

avaricious: immoderately desirous of acquiring e.g. wealth; "they are avaricious and will do anything for money"; "casting covetous eyes on his neighbor's fields"; "a grasping old miser"; "grasping commercialism"; "greedy for money and power"; "grew richer and greedier"; "prehensile employers stingy with ..."

commerce: transactions (sales and purchases) having the objective of supplying commodities (goods and services)

speculation: an investment that is very risky but could yield great profits; "he knew the stock was a speculation when he bought it"

profiteer: someone who makes excessive profit (especially on goods in short supply)

grievance: grudge, a resentment strong enough to justify retaliation; "holding a grudge"; "settling a score"

mutiny: open rebellion against constituted authority (especially by seamen or soldiers against their officers)

consternation: alarm, fear resulting from the awareness of danger

divisive: having a quality that divides or separates

vigilant: carefully observant or attentive; on the lookout for possible danger; "a policy of open-eyed awareness"; "the vigilant eye of the town watch"; "there was a watchful dignity in the room"; "a watchful parent with a toddler in tow"

disposition: your usual mood; "he has a happy disposition"

debtor: a person who owes a creditor; someone who has the obligation of paying a debt

apparition: a ghostly appearing figure; "we were unprepared for the apparition that confronted us"

consumption: the utilization of economic goods to satisfy needs or in manufacturing; "the consumption of energy has increased steadily"

carnage: slaughter, the savage and excessive killing of many people

concession: a point conceded or yielded; "they won all the concessions they asked for"

treason: a crime that undermines the offender's government

encompass: include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory; "This group encompasses a wide range of people from different backgrounds"; "this should cover everyone in the group"

corroborate: support with evidence or authority or make more certain or confirm; "The stories and claims were born out by the evidence"

fuedal: any system that resembles the one used in the middle ages, where the people provided labour and military service to a lord in return for the use of his land. A form of contractual servitude.

prominent: standing out, or projecting; jutting; protuberant; Likely to attract attention from its size or position; conspicuous; Eminent; distinguished above others

Democrazting Twentieth Century America Homework

Democracy and Equality for Women- The Right to Vote: Why Then?

Read Zinn pages 321-329
Answer the following questions. For each, provide a quote from the text that helped you determine your answer.
Each answer should consist of several complete sentences.
Below, you will find a list of vocabulary and definitions to assist you as you read.

1. Discuss Upton Sinclair's book The Jungle. Why do you think he wanted more government regulation of business? Why do you think such problems were new in the Twentieth Century?

2. Discuss the relationship between banks and railroads.

3. Discuss Taylorism. How were immigrants impacted by Taylorism? Why do you think some people call typical public high schools with bells and timed periods the "factory model"?

4. What happened at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company? Why do you think this led to increased calls for regulation of business?

5. Analyze the findings of the Commission on Industrial Relations, 1914. What would you have said next if you were Weinstock?

6. How did race impact the ability of workers to organize into unions?

obscure- not clear; hidden
exiled-to be banished (by your country)
commodities- economic goods
resolution- resolving
perforated- having a hole
commenced- to initiate, to begin
exclusion- to leave out
hobnobbed- to hang out with socially
anarchists- people who rebels against authority

Sunday, June 6, 2010

Final Exam Review

Civil War Review

You may have one page of notes, front and back. 8 1/2 by 11.

Civil War/Reconstruction Final Review Sheet

Economics Politics
The Civil War Reconstruction
People
Nullification,
industrialization,
agrarian,
yeoman,
industrial capitalist,
deficit,
King Cotton,
Freedman’s Bank,
Tariff,
Inflation,
Panic,
Greenback,
Gold Rush,
slave power,
popular sovereignty,
Whigs,
Democrats,
Republicans,
Mexican War,
Manifest, Destiny,
Polk,
Missouri Compromise,
Compromise of 1850,
Fugitive Slave Act ,
“Bleeding Kansas,”
Popular Sovereignty,
Colonizationist,
Gradualist,
Immediatist,
Abolitionist,
Wilmot Proviso,
Kansas
Nebraska Act,
Dred Scot Decision,
Habeas Corpus,
Union’s Naval Strategy
Fort Sumter,
Bull Run,
Irvin McDowell,
George Fitzhugh,
Conscription Act,
20th Maine,
Battle of Gettysburg,
Emancipation Proclamation,
Draft Riots,
Sherman’s March,
Battle of Vicksburg,
Gettysburg,Fredericksburg, Shilo
Sherman Field Order 15,
Battle of Shiloh,
Battle of Chancelorsville,
Sanitary Commission,
Border State,
Conscription Act,
Appomattox,
Poll Taxes,
Grandfather Clauses,
Literacy Test,
Reconstruction Act 1867,
Freedman’s Bureau,
Klan Enforcement Act,
Plessy vs. Ferguson,
Compromise of 1877,
Freedman’s Bank.
Ku Klux Klan
13, 14, 15 amendments,
Radical Republican,
Congressional Reconstruction,
Presidential Reconstruction,
Wade-Davis Bill,
Black Codes,
Union League,
Southern Homestead Act 1866,
Blacks’ Role in Reconstruction Politics,
Carpetbagger,
Scalawag
Abraham Lincoln,
Andrew Jackson,
Andrew Johnson,
Harriet Beecher Stowe,
Frederick Douglass,
Stephen Douglass,
John Breckenridge,
John Bell,
Henry Clay,
Ulysses Grant,
Robert E. Lee,
Stonewall Jackson,
Jefferson Davis,
John Wilkes Booth,
George McClellan,

Frederick Douglass,
Sherman,
Rutherford Hayes,
Samuel Tilden,
Howard Zinn

Lincoln on black citizenship
Industrialization
Chicago
Eerie Canal
Urbanization
Sherman Anti Trust Act
Interstate Commerce Commission
Socialism
Rockefeller
Carnegie
Geography of the U. S. before and after the war.
Law & Order Group
- Fredrick Douglass
- Eli Whitney
- Jefferson Davis
- Andrew Jackson
- Daniel Webster
- The "Associates"
- Renters Strike / Anti-Rent Movement
- Dorr's Rebellion
- Flour Riot of 1837
- Kensington Riots
- Economic Crisis of 1857
- Lowell Strike (1836)
- Working Class Consciousness
- Lynn, MA Strike (1857)
- Cotton Boom
- Westward Expansion (impact on Native Americans)
- Mexican War; impact of the Nullification Crisis
- Compromise of 1850
- Married Woman's Property Act
- Wilmot Proviso
- Force Act

- Map of the USA in 1840
- Mexican Cession
- Oregon Territory
- Sante Fe, New Mexico
- St.Louis, MO
- New York, NY
- Charleston, South Carolina
- Appalachian Mountains
- New Orleans, Lousiana
- Whig party
-

- Market economy / Commerical economy
- Race and Class in the North and South
- Role of women in the North and South
- Patroonship system
- Differences between upper South
- Jacksonian Democracy
- Cottom Boom

- Slump
- Panic
- Industrialization ; it's impact on North and South
- Immigration
- Urbanization ; impact in theh North and South
- Suffrage
- Manifest Destiny
- Annexation
- Northern / Southern Congressional Balance
- Free Labor / Slave Labor
- Nullification
- Commercial Economy
- Abraham Lincoln and his views on Slavery
- Dredd Scott
- Political / Economical ideological spectrum
- Fredrick Douglass (Slave Narrative & documentary watched in class)
- Be able to identify Union and Confederate States given a map, as well as a present day map.

Final Exam Review Terms

You may have one page of notes on 8 1/2 by 11 paper, front and back. You may not share notes.

Democratizing 20th Century America


Read Next Chapter in Zinn (surprises) up to Attica Riots
Arthur Sschlesinger: A Thousand Days
unemployment, poverty rates whites/blacks
Lyndon Johnson
Watts, Los Angeles
black migration to the North
Julius Lester
urban riots, 1967
National Advisory Committee on Urban Disorders
"Black Power Movement"
Black Panthers
Civil Rights Rights Act 1968
Vietnam War
King, FBI
COINTELPRO
"black capitalism"
black middles class
socialism
communism
fascism
democracy
capitalism
imperialism
Open Door Policy
Atlantic Charter
Executive Order 9066
WWII
Cold War
Levittown
Truman
Eisenhower
Manhattan Project
ideological realignment
NAACP
Hiroshima/Nagasaki
Red Scare
GI Bill
Korean War
NATO
Warsaw Pact
Brown v. Bd of Ed
Civil Rights Movement
Emmet Till
Rosa Parks
E. D. Nixon
Women and the Civil Rights Movement
James Meredith
Massive Resistance
Smith Act
southern blacks and the communist party
Truman's Committee on Civil Rights
use of Federal Courts
Greensboro, NC
CORE/Freedom Rides
John Kennedy and blacks
SNCC
Mississippi Summer
Executive Order 9835
World Events regarding communism
Anti Colonialism in Africa
Joseph McCarthy
Anti-Communism in the U. S.
Internal Security Act
Julius/Ethel Rosenberg
House Un-American Activities Committee
ACLU
U. S. military expenditures
Guatemala
Fidel Castro/ Bay of Pigs Invasion
U. S. military campaign in Pacific/bombings
U. S. Strategic Bombing Survey
Manhattan Project
Hiroshima
Nagasaki
Role of U. S. in post war world**
Role of Soviet Union in post war world
Greece/Turkey
Truman Doctrine**
Red Scare***
communism in China
Korean War
Joseph McCarthy**
Truman's executive order on loyalty
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
FAIR Deal
U. S. v One Package
Griswold v Connecticut
Roe v Wade
Schenck v. U. S.

Concepts:
Scramble for Africa
Red Scare
Fascism
Communism
Socialism
Progressivism
Industrial Capitalism
Immigration; types of; policy toward
Class Consciousness; Class solidarity
strike
Events:
Industrial Revolution
WWI
Great Depression
Bolshevik Revolution
Seattle Strike
Women’s Suffrage Movement
Birth Control Movement

Economics:
Economy of the 1920s
Law of Supply and Demand
Labor Union/collective bargaining
Progressivism
People:
Alice Paul
Woodrow Wilson
Upton Sinclair
Jane Addams
Mary Harris
William McKinley
Mother Mary Jones
Ida Tarbell
Kate Richards O’Hare
J. P. Morgan
Andrew Carnegie
Eugene Debbs
Samuel Gompers
Carrie Chapman Catt
Emma Goldman
Helen Keller
Mary Elizabeth Lease
Charles Schenk,
Oliver Wendel Holmes,
Sacco and Vanzetti,

Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points


Espionage Act
Oliver Wendel Holmes
American Protective League
Green Corn Rebellion Palmer Raids
Gregory Pincus
b) Franz Ferdinand
c) James Wadsworth
d) William Jennings Bryan
e) W. E. B. Dubois
f) J. Edgar Hoover
g) John Rock
h) Anthony Comstock
i) William Foster

NAWSA
2. AFL
3. WP
4. IWW
5. WCTU
1. muckraker
2. Silent Sentinel
3. Marxist
4. scab labor
5. collective bargaining
6. imperialism
7. Taylorism
8. Reformist Motherhood
9. Political Motherhood
10. Republican Mothers
11. Socialist Woman
1. mainstream reason cited for U.S. entry into WWI
2. unrestricted submarine warfare
3. Monroe Doctrine
4. Panama Canal
5. Spanish American War
6. The Jungle
19th amendment
General Assembly
Security Council
NATO
Warsaw Pact
IMF
Allies
Axis
WWII
Cold War
open door policy of equal access
Atlantic Charter
Taft-Hartley Act
Nuremberg Trials
Yalta Conference
Francisco Franco
Nikita Khrushchev
Adolph Eichmann
Chiang Kai-shek
Mao Zedong
John L. Lewis
Joseph McCarthy
Walter White
Curtis Le May
Franklin Roosevelt
Strom Thurmond
Bill Levitt
Harry Truman
Eleanor Roosevelt
Dwight Eisenhower
AFL-CIO
containment
Smith Act
George Wallace
G. I. Bill of Rights
conscientious objector
Executive order 9066
CIA/covert action
Greek/Turkish uprisings
Marshall Plan
Joseph McCarthy
Bay of Pigs Invasion
Iron Curtain
Domino Theory
Prince Edward’s County, VA
military industrial complex
ideological realignment
transistor
Smith Act
Levittown
Julius/Ethel Rosenberg
Richard Wright
Stokely Carmichael
Paul Robeson
Massive resistance
W. E. B. DuBois
Medgar Evers
Lyndon Johnson
John F. Kennedy
Richard Nixon
Dwight Eisenhower
Montgomery Bus Boycott
Young Lords Party
Jones Act
Pedro Albizo Campos
Operation Bootstrap
Commonwealth
Taino
Napalm

Ho Chi Minh
Dow Chemical Co
Urban Riots
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Pentagon Papers
Vietnam War
Saigon
John McNaughton
Ngo Diem
National Liberation Front
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
Mai Lai 4
Tet Offensive
Cambodia
Muhammad Ali
Draft
Anti-war movement
SDS
NAACP
SNCC
CORE
New York Radical Women
WITCH
NOW
Poor Black Woman
Roe vs. Wade
ERA
Our Bodies, Ourselves
Johnnie Tillmon
Counter culture
New Left
Old Left
D├ętente
Prince Edwards County, VA
Covert action/CIA
Martin Luther King
Black Panther Party
Earl Warren
Nikita Khrushchev
Non-aligned nation
Shah/Iran
Barbara Johns
Little Rock, Arkansas
Tom Hayden
Free Speech Movement
Caesar Chavez
Stonewall Riots
Intro 2
Civil Rights Act, 1964
Wounded Knee
Henry Kissinger
Kent State Massacre
Yom Kippur War
George McGovern
OPEC
Poll tax/grandfather clause
Limited Test Ban Treaty
Mattachine Society
Daughter of Bilitis
Liberal Consensus
Betty Friedan
Gloria Steinam
Vietnam Veterans against the War
Vietnamization
Alcatraz Island
Weathermen

Monday, May 17, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century - Project Guidelines

Each group should be prepared to make a 20 minute presentation and host a Q & A for about ten minutes.

Your presentation should answer following questions:

1. Why then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?

2. What gains were won?

3. What gains were sought but not won?

4. If the reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?

Your presentation must:

-Contain a thesis that answers the questions above, focusing on the "Why then?" aspect especially.

-Contains clear agruments (at least 2) that support the thesis.

-Contains at least 6 quotes from 4 of the documents in Goss.

-Contains at least 6 quotes from Zinn and Who Built America.

-Contains at least 3 quotes from an outside source.

-Demonstrate an understanding of the historical time period by making connections to the Cold War and the Civil Rights Movement.

-Demonstrate an ability to use evidence to support a rational argument.

-Discuss at least one important person and one important organization that supported your movement.

-Discuss at least one person or organization that opposed your movement and discuss why.

-Be visually engaging, include images and possibly video to support your arguments

-Include evidence of understanding of your topic and U. S. history

-Include evidence that cooperative work was done within the group.

Remember to consider the presentation that Brandon and Neville made to the class. You want to model your work of off it.

Your personal papers should discuss more deeply one of the essential questions or some other aspect of the presentation that your found interesting. It should use at least 5 of the pieces of evidence from your presentation. It should be between 3-4 pages and thoroughly checked for spelling and grammar errors.

Friday, May 14, 2010

Democratizing Presentation

Tuesday, June 1 - Black Power Movement (both classes)
Wednesday, June 2 - Anti-War Movement (both classes)
Thursday, June 3 - Women's Liberation Movement (non-internship)
Friday, June 4 - Women's Liberation (internship), Latino/Native American (non-internship)

Monday, June 7 - Gay Lesbian Liberation Movement (internship) review (non-internship)
Tuesday, June 8 - Gay Lesbian Liberation Movement (non-internship)
Wednesday, June Lunch - Latino/Native American Liberation Movement

The objective of the presentation is to develop your understanding and interpretation of the assigned readings and films—and thus some of the forces that helped expand democracy and equality in 20th century America. Your presenation should respond to the following questions:


1. Why then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?
2. What gains were won? What gains were sought but not won?
3. If the reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?

Your presenation must:

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Democratizing Homework

Zinn (blue)243-254, (red) 492-501

Identify:

Ray Kroll
Moratorium Day Demonstrations
Vietnam Veterans Against the War
Sam Choy
Ron Kovic
April, 1975
War Powers Resolution

Answer: Why do you think the U. S. "lost" the Vietnam War?

Friday, May 7, 2010

Democratizing 20th Century Homework

Read Zinn (Blue Book) 228-243
Identify:

Laos
CIA/Hmong Tribesman
1968 - attitudes toward Johnson
Richard Nixon
Henry Kissenger
Cambodia
Civil Rights Movement/Vietnam War (discuss SNCC, Muhammad Ali, Martin Luther King) ** 2 quotes
draft
1969-70s - attitudes about the war
Daniel Elsberg/Pentagon Papers
Catholic Church
Kent State
1970 Gallup Poll
Richard Steinke

Friday, April 30, 2010

Democratizing 20th Century Homework

Read Zinn "The Impossible Victory" pg 213-2231, 469-487Ngo Dinh Diem


Ho Chi Minh
Pentagon Papers
Chiang Kai-shek
President Truman
Haiphong
"domino theory"
memo of National Security Council
Ngo Dinh Diem
National Liberation Front
John Kennedy
Lyndon Johnson
Gulf of Tonkin
Napalm
My Lai 4
Tet Offensive

Sunday, April 25, 2010

democratizing terms from zinn

Watts, LA
Urban Riots of 1967
National Advisory Committee on Unrban Disorders Report
Black Power
Black Panthers
Martin Luther King and Vietnam
Martin Luther King and FBI
COINTELPRO
Black Capitalism

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

sorry folks. serious jet lag. this will be due for friday.
Civil War/Recon
Zinn pg 195-210
Identify each term. Consider what Zinn wants you to know, think believe. How does the term connect to the question, "(Why) did Reconstruction fail in the South?
Dr. John Rock
South Carolina Sea Islands
Special Field Order 15
Andrew Johnson
Carpetbaggers
13th, 14th, 15th amendments
Radical Republican Legislation
Andrew Johnson
Election of 1868, numeric breakdown, significance of Negro vote, blacks in congress
Sojouner Truth
Ku Klu Klan
Supreme Court
Election of 1876
Restoration of White Supremacy
Economic changes
Democratizing 20th Century
Zinn pgs 193-206, 452-464
1. Why was the use of Christian themes significant? Discuss.
2. Identify: Robert Williams

3. Greensboro North Carolina

4. Discuss the actions taken by CORE and SNCC to register black voters. Include a quote for each.

5. Identify: Missippi Summer
6. Identify: Malcomn X
7. Discuss the economic differences between blacks and whites. Include numeric data.
8. Select and discuss one quote that illustrates the use of "massive resistance."
9. Discuss Lynodon Johnson and the legislation he signed into law.

Sunday, April 4, 2010

Civil War Break Work

Hey folks,

As you know, I am in Egypt this week. I need you to work on some things while I am gone. It is very important that you do this work, if it is incomplete it will be averaged in as a ZERO for your final report card.

1) You MUST finish your films. They are due on April 13 and there are absolutely no exceptions.

2) Look over the the submission requirements for your group's project. Please make sure that your group's folder contains ALL of the requied materials. Anything missing will negatively impact your grade.

3) Using 3 quotes from each of the two Lincoln readings (Lincoln and Abolitionists/Natural, Citizenship and States' Rights), answer the EQ for the unit: Did Lincoln Fight the War to Free the Slaves or Preserve the Union? This should be typed, double spaced and about 3 pages. Work on this in class and type at home. Your paper should have at least 2 arguments and directly quote Lincoln at least twice.

4) If you finidh early, Read Zinn, "Slavery Without Submission, Emancipation without Freedom" Select any ten quotes and discuss their significance. Our last unit will be on Reconstruction and this chapter sets a nice context.

Democratizing Break Work

Hey folks,

I hope everyone enjoyed his or her break. As you know, I am in Egypt next week. I have left a list of terms for you to identify with the sub. The terms are based on the introduction from Goss's "Movements of the New Left." You MUST complete the reading and terms by the time I get back. No excuses will be accepted.

If you haven't read the introduction yet, please do so. Identify the terms NEATLY in your notebooks and I will check them when I get back. This reading is crucial; you must reference it in your final paper/presentation.

If you finish early (I doubt you will) please finish Zinn's "Or Does it Explode."

You all will have had virtually two weeks off from school, and you may not play around when I am out. I will be quite disappointed if my room is trashed and none of you have completed the work when I get back. Incomplete assignments will be counted as a ZERO test grade.

See you soon. Miss ya!

Friday, March 26, 2010

Exhibitions

Hey folks.
I'm going to post homework for Democratizing and Civil War tomorrow.
Can any folks who are presenting exhibitions next round please send them to me NO LATER than Monday so I can give you some feedback before I leave. Please send me a copy even if you had given me a hard copy.

Sunday, March 21, 2010

Civil War homework - March 21

Read Lincoln and Black Abolitionists, Sec III (Finish packet)

Select 3-4 quotes for discussion. Analyze and interpret each quote. (What does author want you to know, think, believe?) Be prepared to share with the class.


Democratizing Homework March 21

Read Zinn - (Pick up after Truman's Civil Rights Commission Recomendations, blue book page 189-197)
identify (include one quote):
Brown v. Board of Education
Rosa Parks
Martin Luther King
Robert Williams
Greensboro, NC
CORE/Freedom Rides
SNCC
Stokely Carmicheal

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Civ/Recon Homework

Read: Allies for Emancipation Sec I.
1. What was Lincoln's position on the Mexican War?
2. Select two quotes (one may be just a word or two) in which Lincoln discusses slavery in the first part of the section. How does he compare against other abolitions we have studied like Garrison or Douglass? Explain.
3. Discuss Lincoln's use of black women in his discussion of negro citizenship.
4. What was Lincoln's overall position on negro citizenship before the war?
I posted the vocab as a comment. For some reason I can paste here.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Democratizing 20th Century Homework March 9

Read Zinn 427-442 (blue book 163-181)
Indentify the Following Terms using the same strategy used in the previous assignment.

Korea/Japan
Korean War
Berlin Airlift
Increasing Nationalism in African Nations
Joseph McCarthy/McCarthyism **(two quotes)
Liberals and the Red Scare
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
House Un-American Activities Committee
ACLU
U. S. Military Expenditures
Marshall Plan
John F Kennedy
Fidel Castro/Cuban Revolution

Saturday, March 6, 2010

Homework March 6

Read Zinn pgs 418-428 (blue book-153-163 )

For each term do the following:

a) describe in your own words

b) write a quote from the text about the term

c) relate the term one of the following questions: 1) Why did the Civil Rights Movement get underway when it did? 2) How was WWII a "war to save capitalism?" 3) How did WWII affect workers and unions? 4) What role did the U. S. play in WWII and the post WWII world?
1 - Social Workers Party

2 - Smith Act
3 - Attitudes toward Japanese
4 - Air raids/bombings
5 - Hiroshima/Nagasaki
6 - Manhattan Project
7 - New World Order/Organization of nations after war
8 - Harry Truman
9 - Truman Doctrine
10 - Greece
11 - Chiang Kai-shek
12 - National Consensus/Cold War Consensus

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Democratizing Twentieth Century Break Assignment

You will be writing term papers and making group presentations this spring. These papers, coupled with your final exams will be about fifty percent of your second semester grades.

Much of the work we do after the Labor Movement unit will be dedicated to preparing for these projects.

In groups you will investigate the roots of a particular New Left reform movement and present the legislative and cultural changes it brought. You can read a little more about the New Left here: http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/article_display.cfm?HHID=376

The groups are as follows:


Civil Rights and Black Power Movements


The Anti-War and Student Movements


People of Color: Latino and Native American Cultural Liberation Movements


The Women's Liberation Movement


The Gay and Lesbian Liberation Movement


The objective of the response paper is to develop your understanding and interpretation of the assigned readings and films—and thus some of the forces that helped expand democracy and equality in 20th century America. Your paper should respond to the following questions:


  1. Why then? Why did the endeavor for this reform get underway when it did?
  2. What gains were won? What gains were sought but not won?
  3. If the reform was only partially achieved, what limited its attainment?


More detailed guidelines and requirements for the projects will be posted shortly, but please remember that all of upcoming readings (including break readings) will have connections to this project. I will post the groups soon. If you have any special requests, please email me at copeland.jl@gmail.com


Break Assignment:


  1. Read and take notes on the following link. When you are finished, create a timeline in your notebook titled "WWII: Major Events"

Your timeline should demonstrate an understanding of the reading.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwtwo/ww2_summary_01.shtml


2. Identify the following terms, people or places from the reading:

-U. S. relationship with Britain, 1939
-Battle of Britain
-Ribbentrop Pact
-Winston Churchill
-Charles de Gaulle
-Operation Barbarossa
-Auschwitz
-VE Day
-War in the Pacific
-Hiroshima, Nagasaki


3. Read Zinn chapter sixteen "A People's War?" pgs 405-415
Answer the following questions:
a) What was the point of the Communist party sketch about the war?
b) List numeric data regarding public participation in the war.
c) Zinn seems to suggest that there was a degree of hypocrisy in the U. S.'s opposition to Germany during the 1930s. Provide two quotes that show evidence of this. Explain.
d) Discuss the pre-WWII relationship between Japan and the United States.

Identify: Atlantic Charter, Open Door Policy


Remember:

Allies- (Major Countries) Britain, France, Soviet Union, United States

Axis- (Major Countries) Germany/Austria, Italy, Japan





Civil War and Reconstruction Break Assignment

For groups doing choice 1:

The primary purpose of this work is to help you plan and organize your documentary.

  1. Look over the checklist for your group's assignment. What have you done already? What needs to be done?
  2. Your group should bring a folder to class on Monday that contains:
    1. An index card with a summary of your film that could pitch it to a producer. It should convey your film's point of view (thesis) and highlight the major scenes.
    2. A one page narrative (typed, double spaced) that discusses the evolving political and economic conditions of the United States during Douglass' life. This piece should include numeric/statistical data.
    3. A list of five individuals who directly and indirectly impacted Douglass' life. (You should be prepared to profile these individuals and include them somehow in your film)
    4. 8-10 quotes from the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass that will be read or presented during your film. Each quote should be typed and include an analysis and rationale for use. Why is this quote significant? How does it relate to the film's point of view? What do you want the audience to know and think when they hear this quote?
    5. 3 quotes from and outside source that will be read, presented or acted out during your film. Each quote should be typed and include an analysis and rationale for use. Why is this quote significant? How does it relate to the film's point of view? What do you want the audience to know and think when they hear this quote?
    6. 7-8 storyboards; one for each scene in your documentary. This should include your roundtable discussion.
    7. A personal opinion statement about Douglass from each member that will be shared during the roundtable discussion.
    8. A list of 5 questions that will be asked by moderator during roundtable discussion.


You all will have some group time on Monday and I will come around and assess your progress. Your group will get an on the spot grade based on the contents of your folder. If all of the contents are included, neat and organized your group will get an A. If not, you already know. This will count as an exam grade.


For groups doing choice 2 or 3:

  1. Look over the checklist for your group's assignment. What have you done already? What needs to be done?
  2. Your group should bring a folder to class on Monday that contains:

    1. An index card with a summary of your film that could pitch it to a producer. It should convey your film's point of view (thesis) and highlight the major scenes.
    2. A one page narrative (typed, double spaced) that discusses the evolving political and economic conditions of the United States during Douglass' life. This piece should include numeric/statistical data.
    3. A list of five individuals who directly and indirectly impacted Douglass' life. (You should be prepared to profile these individuals and include them somehow in your film)
    4. 8-10 quotes from the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass that will be read, presented or acted out during your film. Each quote should be typed and include an analysis and rationale for use. Why is this quote significant? How does it relate to the film's point of view? What do you want the audience to know and think when they hear this quote?
    5. 3 quotes from and outside source that will be read, presented or acted out during your film. Each quote should include an analysis and rationale for use. Why is this quote significant? How does it relate to the film's point of view? What do you want the audience to know and think when they hear this quote?
    6. 6-8 storyboards; one for each scene in your film.


Thursday, February 11, 2010

Storyboards

What is a storyboard?

Once a concept or script is written for a film or animation, the next step is to make a storyboard. A storyboard visually tells the story of an animation panel by panel, kind of like a comic book.

Your storyboard will should convey some of the following information:

  • What charaters are in the frame, and how are they moving?
  • What are the characters saying to each other, if anything?
  • How much time has passed between the last frame of the storyboard and the current one?
  • Where the "camera" is in the scene? Close or far away? Is the camera moving?

Why make a storyboard?

Creating a storyboard will help you plan your animation out shot by shot. You can make changes to your storyboard before you start animating, instead of changing your mind later. You will also be able to talk about your animation and show your storyboard to other people to get feedback on your ideas.

How do I make a storyboard?

Most commonly, storyboards are drawn in pen or pencil. If you don't like to draw you can also take photos, cut out pictures from magazines, or use a computer to make your storyboards. Keep in mind that your drawings don't have to be fancy! In fact, you want to spend just a few minutes drawing each frame. Use basic shapes, stick figures, and simple backgrounds. If you draw your storyboard frames on index cards, you can rearrange them to move parts of the the story around.

Storyboard Language

CLOSE-UP SHOT: A close range of distance between the camera and the subject.
DISSOVLE: A transition between two shots, where one shot fades away and simultaneously another shot fades in.
FADE - A transition from a shot to black where the image gradually becomes darker is a Fade Out; or from black where the image gradually becomes brighter is a Fade In.
HIGH CAMERA ANGLE: A camera angle which looks down on its subject making it look small, weak or unimportant.
JUMP CUT: A rapid, jerky transition from one frame to the next, either disrupting the flow of time or movement within a scene or making an abrupt transition from one scene to another.
LEVEL CAMERA ANGLE: A camera angle which is even with the subject; it may be used as a neutral shot.
LONG SHOT: A long range of distance between the camera and the subject, often providing a broader range of the setting.
LOW CAMERA ANGLE: A camera angle which looks up at its subject; it makes the subject seem important and powerful.
PAN: A steady, sweeping movement from one point in a scene to another.
POV (point of view shot): A shot which is understood to be seen from the point of view of a character within the scene.
REACTION SHOT- 1.: A shot of someone looking off screen. 2.: A reaction shot can also be a shot of someone in a conversation where they are not given a line of dialogue but are just listening to the other person speak.
TILT: Using a camera on a tripod, the camera moves up or down to follow the action.
ZOOM: Use of the camera lens to move closely towards the subject.

source: http://accad.osu.edu/womenandtech/Storyboard%20Resource/